PARIS FASHION WEEK via INSTAGRAMSeptember 26th to 30th

All I can say about Paris is…. Jean Paul Gaultier, Jean Paul Gaultier, Jean Paul Gaultier. 👏👏👏👏👏👏👏 

  1. Bonjour Paris! C’est bon d’être ici encore!! #PFW
  2. Outside the Dior fun house mirrors at the Louvre. 
  3. After a much needed sleep in my first look of the day is Viktor & Rolf. 
  4. Look who else made it to Paris Fashion Week!! Giving the first copy of my book #StudyOfPose to Mr. Jean Paul Gaultier who so kindly wrote the forward. Pre-order your copy now at a discount here: http://www.whosay.com/l/Svz9jXR
  5. First stop of the day is the Stella McCartney show at the beautiful Paris Opera House. #PFW
  6. Having a post-show moment overlooking the Paris Opera House where Stella McCartney’s SS15 collection was presented. Thanks to Stella for my funky head to toe #LuchaLibre look! Ear cuff is my own #ohsococobb for BaubleBar collection, available for just a few more days!
  7. Sat at Giambattista Valli with my friend Rachel Zoe (pronounced “Ra-chelle” to the French) and Lena Perminova.
  8. Walking the Jean Paul Gaultier ready-to-wear runway for the very last time was certainly bitter sweet. What an amazing show he put on. 

  9. My last night in Paris and a week I’ll never forget. I’ll leave you with this final joyful picture from my dear friend Jean Paul Gaultier’s legendary final Prêt à Porter show. Au revoir mes amis!

Follow me on Instagram @cocorocha

My book #StudyOfPose also made it with me to Hong Kong! Its officially released in just 2 weeks but available RIGHT NOW for the discounted pre-order price of just $40. There are 1000 poses and over 2000 pages in the book, so when you break it down you’re paying about 4 cents a pose. BARGAIN! - Click here! 

My book #StudyOfPose also made it with me to Hong Kong! Its officially released in just 2 weeks but available RIGHT NOW for the discounted pre-order price of just $40. There are 1000 poses and over 2000 pages in the book, so when you break it down you’re paying about 4 cents a pose. BARGAIN! - Click here! 

image

Flare Magazine kept me pretty busy for their October issue, and I can’t complain. It’s not every day that I get to serve as the guest editor for a magazine I’m on the cover of! If you want a sneak peak of my role as the art director for a roller-disco themed editorial, keep an eye on my blog next week. For now, check out my full interview with Flare where I share a few insider secrets. Xx

Flare Magazine October 2014

The multi-talented model, social media master and guest editor of FLARE shares the lessons that transformed her from a nerdy B.C. girl into a fashion revolutionary.

Modelling is one of few jobs in which a 26-year-old can celebrate over 10 years at the top of her profession. When a scout discovered Coco Rocha in Vancouver, she was, by her own description, “a dorky 14-year-old who didn’t know left from right.” By 15, she had signed with her first agency; by 17, she’d landed an exclusive contract with career-making photographer Steven Meisel; and at 18, she Irish jigged her way down Jean Paul Gaultier’s runway—and onto the cover of Vogue, where she was named among the next generation of top models. Since then, she’s walked in over 300 shows and appeared on more than 100 magazine covers.

She’s also redefined modeldom for the millennial set. One of the first in her field to embrace social media, she’s made her voice as important as her supernaturally chiseled cheekbones for the benefit of almost 14 million followers, and she’s become a powerful advocate for the up-and-coming cohort of aspiring Cocos. Last year, she helped pass a New York labour law to improve working conditions for underage models. This month, she’ll add author to her résumé, with a 1,000-photo coffee table tome called Study of Pose. Even more impressively, she’s accomplished all of this on her own terms: you won’t see nudity or overt sexuality in any of her photos.

But beneath the powerhouse exterior, Rocha has always had an alluring oddball quality—a glimmer of that gawky teen, a flash of self-aware wit—that shines through in our shoot and behind-the-scenes video below at the Dream hotel in New York City. (Rocha wanted to capture the civilian encounters she’s had over the years while leaving and returning to hotel rooms, glammed up in full photo-shoot regalia.)

And so, to mark her industry-changing decade in fashion, we asked Rocha to trace her evolution from a naïve B.C. kid to a bona fide brand. Here, 10 lessons that shaped Coco Rocha.

Know Your Designers

One of my first runway jobs was opening a DKNY show. I was 18 and knew nothing about Donna Karan. But I must have done well because I was asked to open her second show—for her main line, Donna Karan—a few days later. I went to the fitting, and Donna was there, and she looked at me and said, “Mmm … Donna must love you.” She was referring to herself in the third person, but I thought, Oh, so this isn’t Donna. Donna must be her sister, who had me open the first show, therefore this must be Karan. For a year or two after, I assumed Donna and Karan were twin sisters who had two different lines. I only realized I was wrong when

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Today is Jean Paul Gaultier’s final RTW show after 38 years. 

Of all the shows in all the cities, I have loved my fittings with Jean Paul Gaultier the most. While most designers are pulling their hair out with mere days or hours to go before their show, Jean Paul is cool and calm and always there with a huge smile on his handsome boyish face. There is always time to catch up, to chat about your travels, your family and your life. Invariably Gaultier has cake at all his fittings and is quick to offer you a second slice. I remember one year Gaultier took me to the roof top of his atelier, just to show me the sun set over Paris. It was touching and sweet that he would take this kind of time with a new model, but that is typical of Jean Paul Gaultier.

Over the years Mr. Gaultier has given me some of my most memorable experiences on the runway. He loves to create a performance and, after meeting him at 17 I think he saw in me a willing and eager young model always up for a new challenge. One year he dressed me as a mermaid with my legs bound together into a fishtail and I hopped down the runway on crutches made of coral. Half the way down I was supposed to pull a zipper to release my legs, but the zipper didn’t work so I pushed my long nail into the fish tale and ripped it bottom to top. Most designers would go berserk over a model ripping a garment but Gaultier loved the theatrics of it. Another time he asked me to Irish dance down his runway to Scottish highland bag pipes. It was a little known skill I had at the time but Vogue later dubbed it the “Coco Moment” and from then on I was forever known as Coco, the Irish dancing model. I’ll also never forget when Jean Paul asked me to stage a cat fight with another model on the runway, she was secretly pregnant at the time so I went easy on her and most of the fight was her yanking me around by my hair. Apparently it was so convincingly executed that members of the front row got up to break us up. Last year Mr. Gaultier again called me in for a special runway performance. I had just cut my hair short and so he dressed me up as John Travolta in Grease and together with his choreographer Bianca Li, we worked on a dance number that left me with bruised knees for months. As always, it was always worth it.

Today is his final show, and we are going to make it a great one! Xx Coco

Today is Jean Paul Gaultier’s final RTW show after 38 years.

Of all the shows in all the cities, I have loved my fittings with Jean Paul Gaultier the most. While most designers are pulling their hair out with mere days or hours to go before their show, Jean Paul is cool and calm and always there with a huge smile on his handsome boyish face. There is always time to catch up, to chat about your travels, your family and your life. Invariably Gaultier has cake at all his fittings and is quick to offer you a second slice. I remember one year Gaultier took me to the roof top of his atelier, just to show me the sun set over Paris. It was touching and sweet that he would take this kind of time with a new model, but that is typical of Jean Paul Gaultier.

Over the years Mr. Gaultier has given me some of my most memorable experiences on the runway. He loves to create a performance and, after meeting him at 17 I think he saw in me a willing and eager young model always up for a new challenge. One year he dressed me as a mermaid with my legs bound together into a fishtail and I hopped down the runway on crutches made of coral. Half the way down I was supposed to pull a zipper to release my legs, but the zipper didn’t work so I pushed my long nail into the fish tale and ripped it bottom to top. Most designers would go berserk over a model ripping a garment but Gaultier loved the theatrics of it. Another time he asked me to Irish dance down his runway to Scottish highland bag pipes. It was a little known skill I had at the time but Vogue later dubbed it the “Coco Moment” and from then on I was forever known as Coco, the Irish dancing model. I’ll also never forget when Jean Paul asked me to stage a cat fight with another model on the runway, she was secretly pregnant at the time so I went easy on her and most of the fight was her yanking me around by my hair. Apparently it was so convincingly executed that members of the front row got up to break us up. Last year Mr. Gaultier again called me in for a special runway performance. I had just cut my hair short and so he dressed me up as John Travolta in Grease and together with his choreographer Bianca Li, we worked on a dance number that left me with bruised knees for months. As always, it was always worth it.

Today is his final show, and we are going to make it a great one! Xx Coco

Lovely industry insight into the wonderful world of my friend Jean Paul Gaultier in The New York Times. His final Ready-To-Wear show is truly the end of an era! Xx

Jean Paul Gaultier’s Shows, the Clothes, the Man and His HeritageBy JOHN KOBLIN and MATTHEW SCHNEIER SEPT. 23, 2014The news that JPG was shutting down his ready-to-wear business, with his last collection scheduled to be shown on Saturday in Paris, prompted recollections from industry notables who have long considered Mr. Gaultier one of the most original people in fashion — both on and off the runway.The ShowsThierry-Maxime Loriot, curator, “The Fashion World of Jean Paul Gaultier: From the Sidewalk to the Catwalk”: “He pushed barriers of fashion and society and showed an open vision of society. Everybody was always welcome on his catwalk — whatever age, body shape, skin color, gender … there’s something very humanist in his approach to fashion. For me, that’s the most important thing.”Franca Sozzani, editor of Italian Vogue: “The ’80s and the ’90s were really his years. When we were going to Paris, Jean Paul Gaultier was the one you go to see.”Tim Blanks, editor at large, Style.com: “He was absolutely peerless for the longest time in the late ’80s and early ’90s. Each show was an absolutely remarkable hybrid of fashion and social comment. The sense of event that surrounded fashion was very different from the sense of event that surrounds it now. It was much more like a cult band inspiring this incredible devotion. The crowd would be full of drag queens and cult rock stars and things.”Marian McEvoy, European fashion editor at Women’s Wear Daily, 1975-90: “When he first began, like so many designers, he wasn’t rolling in the big bucks, so he would give out favors. His Christmas presents were really unusual. One of his first collections, he gave all the people in the audience very large, metallic bracelets that were actually tin cans. It was so funny. We were all wearing this tin can for about a week.”Ken Downing, fashion director of Neiman Marcus: “The theater and the drama always made those Gaultier shows. I liked the show where there were bales of hay everywhere. And the models came out with hay in their hair. And as they were traversing through all of it, the dust from the hay was kicking up and we were all getting a little weepy and not because the fashion was so moving but because our eyes were filling with dust from the straw. It was one of those moments.”Simon Doonan, creative ambassador, Barneys New York: “If you look at his old shows, they were often about 45 minutes long, which today is unthinkable. You have eight minutes of choreographed efficiency today. People would be terrified to have a show run for that length. I can still remember going to Gaultier shows, with incense and clanging bells and people laughing. It was a completely different atmosphere to the shows today, which are very militaristic.”Michelle Stein, president, Aeffe USA (Aeffe held the Jean Paul Gaultier license from 1994 to 2012): “I was always just breathless at the end of every show and hoping that everyone in the audience was as excited as I was, which was not always the case. When People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA) stormed the runway [at the fall 2003 show], the people at Gaultier were prepared! The security was out with these massive fur coats, and they jumped up on the runway and wrapped these people in the fur coats and off the runway! Oh my god, it was crazy.”The ClothesThierry-Maxime Loriot: “When you see Gaultier clothes, you don’t even need to look at the label. You just recognize it immediately.”Marian McEvoy: “There was a real rapport with the streets, right from the very beginning. I think that’s where he gleaned a lot of his ideas, straight from the street, not an idea or a travelogue.”Simon Doonan: “Years ago, Madonna loaned us at Barneys the pointy-bra, gold ‘Blonde Ambition’ corset. It was the most beautifully made thing I’ve ever seen in my life. It took us hours to unlace it and get it onto a mannequin. It was a piece of exquisite craftsmanship.”Linda Fargo, senior vice president, Bergdorf Goodman: “That cone bra? That’s something he started as a boy. There was a teddy bear that he had and he actually made, out of paper or something, on his teddy bear. What was he, 5 or 6? And he was already dreaming about a cone bra on a bear.”The ManMarian McEvoy: “He had a wonderful sense of playfulness, humor was a big part of his look and his style. But he was clearly a very solid fashion designer. It was highly unusual. I guess if you think that his contemporaries at that moment were people like Thierry Mugler and Claude Montana — let’s just say they took themselves much more seriously.”Coco Rocha, model: “He was one who treated models like human beings. I know that sounds ridiculous, but sometimes you go to castings and they don’t know your name, you’re just there to wear the clothes. Gaultier, you will go to his atelier and he has food and he wants to sit down with you. He even took me out to his rooftop to watch the sunset. He takes time with his models and let’s them know what the whole show is about. We feel more creative. You want to do good for him. You don’t want to just walk down the runway.”The ProvocateurHamish Bowles, Vogue’s international editor at large, who as the 25-year-old fashion director of Harpers & Queen, walked the runway in Mr. Gaultier’s fall 1989 show, after a chance encounter a few months earlier in Riccione, Italy, where the collection was being produced: “Jean Paul had a party bus for his team and one night we went from mega disco to mega disco, which was cheesy fun. Very late, that tipsy night, his general factotum and press guy Lionel Vermeil said to me, ‘Jean Paul has been thinking that he’d really like you to be in his next women’s show … would you consider it?’ Naturally, I was thrilled beyond and immediately said, ‘Yes, yes, yes,’ at which point Lionel added, ‘The show is inspired by ’20s Weimar lesbians.’“I hadn’t told a soul and there was only a very slow realization in the audience that it was me — largely I think because on my first exit I really camped it up doing exaggerated ‘Paris is Burning’ runway moves (which happily have been eviscerated from the only YouTube video I could find), whilst everyone else had got the dour Weimar brief and came stomping out looking surly. So there was no mistaking me. Before I went out a second time, Jean Paul instructed me to tone down the moves, which was just as well as the pants under my kilt had been taken out too much after the fitting and started sliding down my then snake-like hips in mid shimmy — so my statelier gait helped avoid an international incident as one hand on hip was effectively keeping the pants up. I don’t think anyone could believe that I’d actually done it but it was all part of JPG’s revolutionary gender-bender antics.”His LegacyMichelle Stein: “The whole industry has changed so much since Jean Paul began, but he’s just one of the best designers who have ever lived. It’s so sad to think that the general public will no longer have the opportunity to see the ready to wear, nor to wear it. I still go into my closet and my favorite pieces in my wardrobe are Jean Paul Gaultier.”Thierry-Maxime Loriot: “When you see who was assisting him, from Martin Margiela to Nicolas Ghesquière to Peter Dundas, who have all been Gaultier’s assistants, you really see in their work how they’ve been influenced by him. He left a big print in the fashion industry.”Linda Fargo: “For me, Jean Paul Gaultier was part of my awakening in fashion. There’s a handful of designers that did that for me.”Coco Rocha: Gaultier, along with Steven Meisel, made my career. Meisel was the one who found me, scouted me, made me. Gaultier? He made me Irish dance down the runway in 2007. Every day I’m reminded by someone who says, ‘You were the girl that Irish-danced down Gaultier’s runway.’ People remember that.”Simon Doonan: “Often fashion today feels a little bit abstract. You look at these very expensive, complicated collections that are shown by high-level designers and you think, ‘I wonder who’s going to wear that.’ With Gaultier, the models were wearing it, the editors were wearing it, and the general public was wearing it — or wearing some version of it that was mass-produced.”Tim Blanks: “I think there was a sense for a very long time that JPG would be the heir to Yves Saint Laurent, that he was the standard-bearer for French fashion at its purest. It was so obvious that Gaultier should be the designer at Dior. Galliano got the job and I remember people were quite surprised by that.”Stefano Tonchi, editor of W magazine: “I think he invented streetwear in prêt-à-porter. He brought it there. Now, really, it doesn’t quite exist anymore. Prêt-à-porter is couture. The prices, the look, the things that you see at prêt-à-porter collections are really couture. It’s like beautiful couture pieces made in multiples.”Anna Wintour, editor in chief of American Vogue and artistic director of Condé Nast: “He’s always been a showman. I do think that recently his whole emphasis has been much more on the couture and having fun with the couture. I don’t think we’re going to lose that Gaultier moment.”

Lovely industry insight into the wonderful world of my friend Jean Paul Gaultier in The New York Times. His final Ready-To-Wear show is truly the end of an era! Xx

Jean Paul Gaultier’s Shows, the Clothes, the Man and His Heritage
By JOHN KOBLIN and MATTHEW SCHNEIER SEPT. 23, 2014

The news that JPG was shutting down his ready-to-wear business, with his last collection scheduled to be shown on Saturday in Paris, prompted recollections from industry notables who have long considered Mr. Gaultier one of the most original people in fashion — both on and off the runway.

The Shows

Thierry-Maxime Loriot, curator, “The Fashion World of Jean Paul Gaultier: From the Sidewalk to the Catwalk”: “He pushed barriers of fashion and society and showed an open vision of society. Everybody was always welcome on his catwalk — whatever age, body shape, skin color, gender … there’s something very humanist in his approach to fashion. For me, that’s the most important thing.”

Franca Sozzani, editor of Italian Vogue: “The ’80s and the ’90s were really his years. When we were going to Paris, Jean Paul Gaultier was the one you go to see.”

Tim Blanks, editor at large, Style.com: “He was absolutely peerless for the longest time in the late ’80s and early ’90s. Each show was an absolutely remarkable hybrid of fashion and social comment. The sense of event that surrounded fashion was very different from the sense of event that surrounds it now. It was much more like a cult band inspiring this incredible devotion. The crowd would be full of drag queens and cult rock stars and things.”

Marian McEvoy, European fashion editor at Women’s Wear Daily, 1975-90: “When he first began, like so many designers, he wasn’t rolling in the big bucks, so he would give out favors. His Christmas presents were really unusual. One of his first collections, he gave all the people in the audience very large, metallic bracelets that were actually tin cans. It was so funny. We were all wearing this tin can for about a week.”

Ken Downing, fashion director of Neiman Marcus: “The theater and the drama always made those Gaultier shows. I liked the show where there were bales of hay everywhere. And the models came out with hay in their hair. And as they were traversing through all of it, the dust from the hay was kicking up and we were all getting a little weepy and not because the fashion was so moving but because our eyes were filling with dust from the straw. It was one of those moments.”

Simon Doonan, creative ambassador, Barneys New York: “If you look at his old shows, they were often about 45 minutes long, which today is unthinkable. You have eight minutes of choreographed efficiency today. People would be terrified to have a show run for that length. I can still remember going to Gaultier shows, with incense and clanging bells and people laughing. It was a completely different atmosphere to the shows today, which are very militaristic.”

Michelle Stein, president, Aeffe USA (Aeffe held the Jean Paul Gaultier license from 1994 to 2012): “I was always just breathless at the end of every show and hoping that everyone in the audience was as excited as I was, which was not always the case. When People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA) stormed the runway [at the fall 2003 show], the people at Gaultier were prepared! The security was out with these massive fur coats, and they jumped up on the runway and wrapped these people in the fur coats and off the runway! Oh my god, it was crazy.”

The Clothes

Thierry-Maxime Loriot: “When you see Gaultier clothes, you don’t even need to look at the label. You just recognize it immediately.”

Marian McEvoy: “There was a real rapport with the streets, right from the very beginning. I think that’s where he gleaned a lot of his ideas, straight from the street, not an idea or a travelogue.”

Simon Doonan: “Years ago, Madonna loaned us at Barneys the pointy-bra, gold ‘Blonde Ambition’ corset. It was the most beautifully made thing I’ve ever seen in my life. It took us hours to unlace it and get it onto a mannequin. It was a piece of exquisite craftsmanship.”

Linda Fargo, senior vice president, Bergdorf Goodman: “That cone bra? That’s something he started as a boy. There was a teddy bear that he had and he actually made, out of paper or something, on his teddy bear. What was he, 5 or 6? And he was already dreaming about a cone bra on a bear.”

The Man

Marian McEvoy: “He had a wonderful sense of playfulness, humor was a big part of his look and his style. But he was clearly a very solid fashion designer. It was highly unusual. I guess if you think that his contemporaries at that moment were people like Thierry Mugler and Claude Montana — let’s just say they took themselves much more seriously.”

Coco Rocha, model: “He was one who treated models like human beings. I know that sounds ridiculous, but sometimes you go to castings and they don’t know your name, you’re just there to wear the clothes. Gaultier, you will go to his atelier and he has food and he wants to sit down with you. He even took me out to his rooftop to watch the sunset. He takes time with his models and let’s them know what the whole show is about. We feel more creative. You want to do good for him. You don’t want to just walk down the runway.”

The Provocateur

Hamish Bowles, Vogue’s international editor at large, who as the 25-year-old fashion director of Harpers & Queen, walked the runway in Mr. Gaultier’s fall 1989 show, after a chance encounter a few months earlier in Riccione, Italy, where the collection was being produced: “Jean Paul had a party bus for his team and one night we went from mega disco to mega disco, which was cheesy fun. Very late, that tipsy night, his general factotum and press guy Lionel Vermeil said to me, ‘Jean Paul has been thinking that he’d really like you to be in his next women’s show … would you consider it?’ Naturally, I was thrilled beyond and immediately said, ‘Yes, yes, yes,’ at which point Lionel added, ‘The show is inspired by ’20s Weimar lesbians.’

“I hadn’t told a soul and there was only a very slow realization in the audience that it was me — largely I think because on my first exit I really camped it up doing exaggerated ‘Paris is Burning’ runway moves (which happily have been eviscerated from the only YouTube video I could find), whilst everyone else had got the dour Weimar brief and came stomping out looking surly. So there was no mistaking me. Before I went out a second time, Jean Paul instructed me to tone down the moves, which was just as well as the pants under my kilt had been taken out too much after the fitting and started sliding down my then snake-like hips in mid shimmy — so my statelier gait helped avoid an international incident as one hand on hip was effectively keeping the pants up. I don’t think anyone could believe that I’d actually done it but it was all part of JPG’s revolutionary gender-bender antics.”

His Legacy

Michelle Stein: “The whole industry has changed so much since Jean Paul began, but he’s just one of the best designers who have ever lived. It’s so sad to think that the general public will no longer have the opportunity to see the ready to wear, nor to wear it. I still go into my closet and my favorite pieces in my wardrobe are Jean Paul Gaultier.”

Thierry-Maxime Loriot: “When you see who was assisting him, from Martin Margiela to Nicolas Ghesquière to Peter Dundas, who have all been Gaultier’s assistants, you really see in their work how they’ve been influenced by him. He left a big print in the fashion industry.”

Linda Fargo: “For me, Jean Paul Gaultier was part of my awakening in fashion. There’s a handful of designers that did that for me.”

Coco Rocha: Gaultier, along with Steven Meisel, made my career. Meisel was the one who found me, scouted me, made me. Gaultier? He made me Irish dance down the runway in 2007. Every day I’m reminded by someone who says, ‘You were the girl that Irish-danced down Gaultier’s runway.’ People remember that.”

Simon Doonan: “Often fashion today feels a little bit abstract. You look at these very expensive, complicated collections that are shown by high-level designers and you think, ‘I wonder who’s going to wear that.’ With Gaultier, the models were wearing it, the editors were wearing it, and the general public was wearing it — or wearing some version of it that was mass-produced.”

Tim Blanks: “I think there was a sense for a very long time that JPG would be the heir to Yves Saint Laurent, that he was the standard-bearer for French fashion at its purest. It was so obvious that Gaultier should be the designer at Dior. Galliano got the job and I remember people were quite surprised by that.”

Stefano Tonchi, editor of W magazine: “I think he invented streetwear in prêt-à-porter. He brought it there. Now, really, it doesn’t quite exist anymore. Prêt-à-porter is couture. The prices, the look, the things that you see at prêt-à-porter collections are really couture. It’s like beautiful couture pieces made in multiples.”

Anna Wintour, editor in chief of American Vogue and artistic director of Condé Nast: “He’s always been a showman. I do think that recently his whole emphasis has been much more on the couture and having fun with the couture. I don’t think we’re going to lose that Gaultier moment.”

NYFW via INSTAGRAM (Part One) - February 5th to 7th

And so it is fashion month. Here is the first installment of this season’s Life via Instagram - #NYFW edition. At the beginning of this whirlwind week I got to see some pretty ladies, wear some cool clothes and celebrate the 2nd anniversary of the Model Alliance. 

  1. The #SuperBowl may be over, but the sex trafficking of young women around big events continues to be a shocking problem right here at home. Go to www.notsosuper.org to find out more. #notsosuper
  2. So excited to see my original model BFF Behati Prinsloo at #amfAR tonight!!!
  3. Hanging with the most glamorous girls of #amfAR: Ireland Baldwin and Gigi Hadid.
  4. The #selfeye is the new #selfie! Here’s mine wearing Max Factor UK’s Excess Volume Mascara! Now I wanna see you post yours! Don’t forget the #SelfEye hashtag.
  5. Much love to The Model Alliance on our 2nd anniversary today! So proud of our efforts - this New York Fashion Week will be the first with real legal protection for child models! Hope you all have a great week! Xx Coco
  6. NYC traffic is horrendous today, but I made it in time for my first show of NYFW - BCBG by Max Azria. Max was one of the earliest supporters of my career! #bcbglive
  7. My second look of the day is the Macy’s #MADE4Impulse line by my friends at Made Fashion Week! It’s the perfect little black dress. Get the look at www.macys.com.
  8. My outfit today - #MADE4Impulse skirt by Macy’s & Made FW paired with a Rebecca Minkoff top and bag. Snow courtesy of my backyard! #NYFW
  9. The other day I gave a private tour of the Jean Paul Gaultier exhibit at the Brooklyn Museum to a small group. Make sure you go to Brooklyn to see this amazing exhibit before it ends on February 23rd!

LIFE via INSTAGRAM- January 8th to 22nd

Hey guys! Its time for another Life via Instagram update. Here is a roundup of some photos from my trip to LA, my new campaign and a selfie taken in Zac Posen’s elevator. By the way, if you didn’t catch my new L’oreal commercial during the Golden Globes you can watch it right here! xx 

  1. Huge congratulations to Her Royal Highness Pat McGrath on her MBE from Queen Elizabeth!!
  2. With Zac Posen, Anna Wintour and Keija Minor.
  3. So happy to have been out of the polar vortex and in 70-degree LA to host the DVF #journeyofadress livestream with Andy Cohen
  4. Sneak peak of the fantastic DVF exhibit opening in LA. Over 200 iconic wrap dress designs and Diane’s unbelievable personal art collection. (at Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA))
  5. DVF showing me the proper knot for my wrap dress. 
  6. Triplets!
  7. New campaign for Spring/Summer 2014! Karlie and I for Jean Paul Gaultier. #SaturdayNightFever
  8. Little known fact: Zac Posen’s wood paneled elevator has both a seat and the perfect lighting. Would you expect anything less?
  9. Got my hands on the new Wilhelmina Models shirt for NYFW!

Life via Instagram (Part One) - October 17th - 24th

It’s time to do a little catching up! In this installment of Life via Instagram I stop by Teen Vogue #FashionU, The Fashion World of JPG opening, and Giorgio Armani's “One Night Only” couture show in New York. Plus, a bill protecting the rights of underage models was finally passed into law. What a busy week…

  1. My look for the Fifth Annual Norman Mailer Center Benefit Gala. Dress by Zac Posen, diamonds by Van Cleef & Arpels.
  2. Backstage at Teen Vogue's #FashionU with Andrew Bevan and Micki Schneider
  3. Had so much fun at #TVFU - thanks to everyone for coming and for all your questions!
  4. Press conference celebrating new legislation protecting child models in New York!
  5. So excited for the opening of The Fashion World of JPG at the Brooklyn Museum. Love Mr. Gaultier!
  6. With the Jean Paul Gaultier dream team at the Brooklyn Museum!
  7. My look for Giorgio Armani’s “One Night Only” event in New York - October 24th, 2013.
  8. At the Armani #onenightonlynyc exhibit and couture show. This dress was made for me for a Vogue Met Gala editorial!
  9. More from Armani’s #onenightonlynyc couture show.

Jean Paul Gaultier -Prêt-à-porter printemps-été 2014

For Jean Paul’s summer 2014 presentation at the Paradis Latin, Gaultier created his own version of Dancing with the Stars. Blanca Li, who choreographed the show (and also some of my Longchamp videos), Rossy de Palma and Tanel Bedrossiantz were the judges of this extraordinary casting.

Watch the video above for my best John Travolta in Grease impression, Karlie Kloss striking a pose voguing and Hannelore Knuts performing a tango. The soundtrack is tops!  "It will be murder on the dancefloor!" promised Jean Paul Gaultier after joining Blanca Li for the frenzied finale.

PARIS via INSTAGRAM (Part Two) September 26th to 30th

Take a look at some more photos from Paris, and while you’re at it watch a clip of my performance at Jean Paul Gaultier’s Grease-inspired show. 

PS. I know you want to copy JPG’s new hairstyle…

  1. Look at my poor knees after rehearsing all day for Jean Paul Gaultier’s show today!
  2. You’re the one that I want! #JPG #PFW
  3. Change of clothes for the Pucci dinner. Thanks for the hairdo, Guido Palau!
  4. With the ladies Harley Newton and Atlanta De Cadenet at #ChloeLive this morning. 
  5. We have a Mount Rushmore of fashion greats at the Glamour Magazine & Patrick Demarchelier dinner party. Who can name all 6?
  6. Jean Paul Gaultier is trying out a new look this season at Paris Fashion Week.