Coco Rocha Reveals Her Technology Tips -  Vogue Australia (photo by Ben Cope)What are your five tips for creating and maintaining a social media presence?1. Don’t have just anyone run your social media. I think it’s insane when brands or celebrities relegate their social media to an intern or someone who does not know them well. 2. Be consistent. Your audience wants to hear from you regularly but not too regularly. People have no problem clicking “unfollow” if they feel you’re over saturating their feed.3. If you’re using platforms like Pinterest don’t try to be a curator of everything under the sun. Know your own personal forte. We have all heard the saying “Jack of all trades, master of none”. Your followers will accept you as a taste expert and authority on a certain subject, but they will not believe you as an expert on everything.4. If you’re posting pictures to platforms like Instagram or Twitter, be selective about the one you post. If I’m capturing a sunset I’ll take at least 10 pictures, I’ll then filter them using other apps, enhance them, then I really pick the best image of perhaps 30. No one wants to follow someone who does not take pride in composing an aesthetically beautiful picture. No random snapshots, treat every upload as if it were a work of art.5. Be current. Know and comment on current trends and news. Don’t be the last one entering a conversation. You’re across so many different social media platforms. What are your favourite features of each one?
[[MORE]]I definitely get more feedback from Instagram than any other platform. I think it’s well suited to my line of work because at its most basic, fashion is a visual experience.Tumblr has become this great aggregate of fashion and photography. What Myspace was to music, Tumblr has become to fashion, a place to watch and to be seen. Tumblr is all about images, and sharing those images. Nowhere else on the web does a beautiful piece of clothing, an amazing editorial or a stunning campaign more than 25,000 times and yet that’s not just because I am a publically known person - with Tumblr, if an image is great, whether it was created by Karl Lagerfeld or the girl next door, the cream rises to the top.Twitter has been a great tool for networking. In the past in order to reach out to someone else in the industry with a question or idea you’d have to go through your agent or publicist to reach their publicist to hopefully deliver the message within a few weeks.  Now it’s instantaneous and I have all kinds of interesting conversations and relationships thanks to Twitter.A new platform I’m loving is TheFancy.com which shows you what you’re looking for before you even know you’re looking for it! You are treated to an endless stream of lust-worthy products, all of which can be purchased either on the Fancy or a third party site. It’s the first social media platform I know of that is, off the bat, looking to drive commerce.  I just started my own subscription box there where people can subscribe to a box of items that I curate every month, here. How do you think technology is impacting fashion and the retail industry?For a long time I think fashion was seen as this untouchable world only for the elite. The industry as a whole is embracing social media, and that is proof that the pendulum is now swinging away from that attitude. More than ever people want to be, and in many cases, expect to be a part of this world and I’m happy to have been here to usher in a more inclusive attitude from within the industry. I think there is a huge opportunity for technology to impact the fashion industry in the way we create and also view supply and demand - that’s actually a topic I will be speaking on at the Bespoke summit at Sydney Opera House on May 16! I hope you can come!
What are the key components of creating a genuine personal brand?It really is almost a full-time job but I don’t do it alone, my husband helps me enormously.  Had I not had his help I probably would have had to close down some of my accounts since there are just not enough hours in the day to manage them all.  It’s important that we keep it in the family though. Personally, even though I have a great PR team no one except my husband and I touch any of my 10 social media accounts. It’s a lot of work but I know that my brand, my image and my voice are authentic to me. What are your favourite technological devices or gadgets?When I leave my house I always grab my iPhone and my iPad mini - those hold my entire world! The iPad mini is so light and easy to manage and most importantly it fits in my purses!
How do you stay organised – software, apps or a hard-copy notebook?My husband and I sync our worlds together across our iPhones, tablets and computers using “the cloud”. If he makes an appointment, I see it. If I add a contact, he sees it. It has been really great for us as we are such busy people. Aside from that there is one app I’m really loving lately called Uber. Getting a taxi in New York can be a nightmare but Uber updates the whole process in a wonderful way providing everything you need on a mobile-based app. On the app you set your pick-up location and get to see, in real time, which cars are in the area. You can literally watch the car travel towards you on GPS. You don’t need cash or a credit card, just pay for the whole thing using the app. I took a car to the airport the other day and the whole process could not have been easier!

Coco Rocha Reveals Her Technology Tips -  Vogue Australia 
(photo by Ben Cope)


What are your five tips for creating and maintaining a social media presence?

1. Don’t have just anyone run your social media. I think it’s insane when brands or celebrities relegate their social media to an intern or someone who does not know them well. 

2. Be consistent. Your audience wants to hear from you regularly but not too regularly. People have no problem clicking “unfollow” if they feel you’re over saturating their feed.

3. If you’re using platforms like Pinterest don’t try to be a curator of everything under the sun. Know your own personal forte. We have all heard the saying “Jack of all trades, master of none”. Your followers will accept you as a taste expert and authority on a certain subject, but they will not believe you as an expert on everything.

4. If you’re posting pictures to platforms like Instagram or Twitter, be selective about the one you post. If I’m capturing a sunset I’ll take at least 10 pictures, I’ll then filter them using other apps, enhance them, then I really pick the best image of perhaps 30. No one wants to follow someone who does not take pride in composing an aesthetically beautiful picture. No random snapshots, treat every upload as if it were a work of art.

5. Be current. Know and comment on current trends and news. Don’t be the last one entering a conversation. 

You’re across so many different social media platforms. What are your favourite features of each one?

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WHY I INSTAGRAM - By Coco Rocha for Vogue
Around 2006 I began noticing the photographers waiting outside runway shows were beginning to outnumber those actually working inside. They were shooting our “model-off-duty” looks and plastering them all over the Internet, where they garnered as much interest and discussion as the campaigns and editorials in which we star. 
These days everyone is his or her own street-style photographer, myself included. As a model in the digital age, the ability to reach an audience outside of the traditional magazine ad and billboard realm is increasingly important to me and my clients who realize we live in a new world of far more social networking- and endorsement-based advertising—from what your friend in school “likes” on Facebook to what your favorite top model wears in her downtime. I use platforms including Instagram, Tumblr, and Pose on a near daily basis to document my own looks for my almost ten million followers worldwide. The responses to my posts are always a gauge of how well I did with my personal styling. A picture that garners 30,000 likes versus one that only gets 5,000 says a lot about where I hit and miss in capturing the fashion zeitgeist. (Surprisingly the pics of just me at home usually get more likes than the ones of me with celebrities or designers.) The only time I get negative feedback is when I post a look containing fur, so now that definitely crosses my mind before I post an image to social media. While I believe everyone must make up his or her own mind, I don’t like to unnecessarily act insensitive to my followers.
Often I’ll have my husband, James, take a few dozen pictures with his phone and then we will edit them until we’ve found the most aesthetically pleasing and interesting image. After that, we filter the pictures using a host of iPhone apps like Camera+, Pictwo, and Snapseed before we decide the image is ready for posting. Selections are always about quality versus quantity. There is no formula as to exactly how many photos I Instagram per day; one day I may post a single shot, where other days I may put up a dozen. I try to share sneak peeks of events I attend, behind the scenes moments at photoshoots, or anything I witness that I think my followers would find interesting. 
Models are never really “off duty” anymore, and I view social media as an extension of my career as a whole. Sometimes posting can feel like a chore and in those cases I view it as a necessary part of my work, but other times it’s genuinely fun to share and document my life with friends far and wide. It’s the way of the 21st-century girl.
See our slideshow above featuring our favorite Coco Rocha Instagrams.

WHY I INSTAGRAM - By Coco Rocha for Vogue

Around 2006 I began noticing the photographers waiting outside runway shows were beginning to outnumber those actually working inside. They were shooting our “model-off-duty” looks and plastering them all over the Internet, where they garnered as much interest and discussion as the campaigns and editorials in which we star. 

These days everyone is his or her own street-style photographer, myself included. As a model in the digital age, the ability to reach an audience outside of the traditional magazine ad and billboard realm is increasingly important to me and my clients who realize we live in a new world of far more social networking- and endorsement-based advertising—from what your friend in school “likes” on Facebook to what your favorite top model wears in her downtime. I use platforms including Instagram, Tumblr, and Pose on a near daily basis to document my own looks for my almost ten million followers worldwide. The responses to my posts are always a gauge of how well I did with my personal styling. A picture that garners 30,000 likes versus one that only gets 5,000 says a lot about where I hit and miss in capturing the fashion zeitgeist. (Surprisingly the pics of just me at home usually get more likes than the ones of me with celebrities or designers.) The only time I get negative feedback is when I post a look containing fur, so now that definitely crosses my mind before I post an image to social media. While I believe everyone must make up his or her own mind, I don’t like to unnecessarily act insensitive to my followers.

Often I’ll have my husband, James, take a few dozen pictures with his phone and then we will edit them until we’ve found the most aesthetically pleasing and interesting image. After that, we filter the pictures using a host of iPhone apps like Camera+, Pictwo, and Snapseed before we decide the image is ready for posting. Selections are always about quality versus quantity. There is no formula as to exactly how many photos I Instagram per day; one day I may post a single shot, where other days I may put up a dozen. I try to share sneak peeks of events I attend, behind the scenes moments at photoshoots, or anything I witness that I think my followers would find interesting. 

Models are never really “off duty” anymore, and I view social media as an extension of my career as a whole. Sometimes posting can feel like a chore and in those cases I view it as a necessary part of my work, but other times it’s genuinely fun to share and document my life with friends far and wide. It’s the way of the 21st-century girl.

See our slideshow above featuring our favorite Coco Rocha Instagrams.

PARIS FASHION WEEK via INSTAGRAM - March 2nd to 4th, 2013

In this installment of Life via Instagram, I have the privilege to sit front row and watch some of the Paris Fashion Week shows for the first time in 18 seasons. I catch up with old friends like Jean Paul Gaultier, who tells me an amazing secret, and I discover who’s on Ellen Von Unwerth’s iPhone screensaver!
  1. Before the Jean Paul Gaultier show with the amazing Numero editor-in-chief, Babeth Djian! #PFW

  2. Strike a pose! The fantastic stage design at Jean Paul Gaultier tonight. #PFW

  3. Jean Paul Gaultier whispering a secret… My lips are sealed!

  4. Picking my look for tonight’s Diesel party at #PFW.

  5. Bumped into two of my favorite people, Ellen Von Unwerth and Renzo Rosso, at the Diesel party!

  6. The official iPhone screensaver of Ellen Von Unwerth ;)

  7. Glamour and I are in agreement - we are all about orange for Spring 2013.

  8. Spotted my friend Ava in the white jacket at Giambattista Valli. She and I used to be roommates years ago!

  9. Anna + team taking it all in at Giambattista Valli - PFW.

LIFE via INSTAGRAM - November 1st - 13th, 2012.
Follow me at @cocorocha for realtime updates! 

  1. Posing with the shark, Mr. Brad Goreski, in his killer Givenchy sweater.
  2. Good morning NYC. I’m back for tonight’s Coalition For The Homeless Artwalk event and hoping the second storm heading our way today shows some mercy.
  3. At Liebeskind NY and I’m having a hard time picking just one bag here.
  4. My look for tonight’s ARTWALK supporting Coalition For The Homeless. (Taken with Pose)
  5. With the man of the hour, Mr. Patrick McMullan, at ARTWALK.
  6. So… Barack Obama just flew overhead in Air Force One.
  7. Pairing my Diesel hoodie with a fancy room. On set with one of my favorite photographers, Ellen Von Unwerth. (Taken with Pose)
  8. The fall colors at my house inspired my look for tonight’s Vogue/CFDA Fashion Fund dinner. Dress by Suno, jacket by Reiss and shoes by Versace. (Taken with Pose)
  9. With Caroline Trentini, one of my all-time favorite girls (and models), at the CFDA Vogue Fashion Fund dinner.

Solomeo - American Vogue

This summer American Vogue flew me out to the Perugia countryside in Italy to visit the beautiful city of Solomeo. You may remember me freaking out after I showed up an hour before my flight (with only carry-on luggage) only to find the airline had SOLD MY SEAT! To cut a long story short, I ended up having to fly a day later and showed up in Solomeo just in time to jump into hair and makeup.

Photographer: Ben Toms
Fashion Editor: Katie Shillingford 

Expanding Her Efforts to Be a Role Model

By Irina Aleksander for The New York Times

ONE afternoon in late July, traffic stopped in Manhattan so that a small parade of models could cross the street. They entered the Coffee Shop, a restaurant in Union Square, and descended to a dimly lighted subterranean lounge with leather banquettes and Champagne buckets filled with mini cartons of coconut water. The girls, most of them around 16 years old, wore shorts and tank tops along with chunky heels and too much eye makeup.

“These are really the babies, but to me, this is the perfect group,” said Coco Rocha, the 23-year-old model, who was there to give a lesson on modeling and social media. She was wearing slim black pants, black boots and a snug white blazer over an oxford shirt buttoned to the neck. Her red hair was pulled up into a neat topknot.

“Who here has a Tumblr blog?” she asked, addressing an audience of several dozen. Ten hesitant hands sprouted. Ms. Rocha smiled. “O.K., what we’re going to talk about in class today is how important it is to brand yourself.” Ms. Rocha, who used to teach dance to 4-year-olds, stood with one foot planted firmly in front of the other, pumping her right knee in the manner of a cabaret dancer as she spoke. “You cannot be just another pretty face,” she added. “Do you know how many girls there are in New York right now?”

More than just a pretty face, Ms. Rocha is one of the few models who has become known by just her first name. At a moment when the fashion industry has increasingly marginalized models — to anonymous, size 0 waifs, a life span of three seasons (that’s a year and a half in human years), and off the magazine covers in place of celebrities like Jennifer Lopez and Lady Gaga — she has emerged as the model’s liberator.

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Solomeo - American Vogue
September, 2012

This summer American Vogue flew me out to the Perugia countryside in Italy to visit the beautiful city of Solomeo. You may remember me freaking out after I showed up an hour before my flight (with only carry-on luggage) only to find the airline had SOLD MY SEAT! To cut a long story short, I ended up having to fly a day later and showed up in Solomeo just in time to jump into hair and makeup.

Photographer: Ben Toms
Fashion Editor: Katie Shillingford