PCMag’s Coco Rocha Explores CE Week’s Wearable Tech - The tech-savvy supermodel gets her hands on enhanced glasses, dresses, and clutches.

By Chandra Steele

The mini mid-year preview of CES that is CE Week landed in New York City last week, and PCMag made the crosstown pilgrimage with one of our newest columnists, Coco Rocha. On display were Wi-Fi-enabled cars, Made in NY startups, the biggest of big-screen TVs, and, of course, wearable tech.

Rocha wrote about Google Glass and other wearable tech in her column this month, and got hands-on with some at the show. Google invited her to try out Google Glass back in January, but at CE Week Rocha tried on an entirely different type of wearable glasses-based technology, PSiO. It combines sound and light therapy for a sensory experience designed to relax and reenergize the wearer.

Rocha also donned a cap outfitted with Cynaps, a Bluetooth-enabled, bone-conduction alternative to earphones. Once an Indiegogo project and now a shipping product, the system lets you listen to music and take calls without headphones interfering with sounds from your surrounding environment.

READ MORE HERE

Google Glass: Getting In Your Face - Is Google Glass the future of wearable tech?
By Coco Rocha for PCMag
At the beginning of this year, Google asked me if I’d like to try out a prototype of Google Glass. Being a complete gadget junkie, I’d read all about them and was as excited as anyone to actually put them on. A future of augmented reality in the form of computer glasses has long been the dream of many a science fiction fan who imagines a world where information is superimposed into his vision, where his every move is documented and archived and thus no memory is ever lost and every experience can be relived. (That may also be a dream function for the NSA.)
Given time, Google Glass definitely has the potential to give us that fully augmented reality that so many have been asking for. But in answering that desire, it’s also brought up some new questions: will we still want it when we have it? Will it overwhelm and shorten our already-minute attention span? Will it make life chaotic or simplify it? And will its intrusion into our perceived privacy and personal space be a cultural issue? The debate has just begun, but so has the technology. From my hour or so with the prototype of Google Glass I got the feeling that it was sort of like the Wright brothers’ flying machine—that we still have a way to go before we get to something more like a Lear jet.
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As obvious as this may sound, I felt keenly self-conscious that I was wearing a small computer strapped to my head. To be straightforward, I think the main problem with most examples of “wearable tech” is that the emphasis is overwhelmingly put on the tech rather than it being truly wearable. To widen their appeal for when Google Glass becomes commercially available, Google would do well to mind its approach to design so that we don’t risk looking like Geordi from Star Trek or a Terminator. It would be smart to partner with established eyewear designers such as Tom Ford or Ray-Ban to create something truly aesthetically pleasing that people would want to wear. Such collaborations could ensure that wearable tech is actually wearable. If not, I feel that Google Glass could quickly go the way of the Bluetooth headset—something that only obnoxious bro-types wear on their heads in 2015.
With Google Glass, I felt the most uncomfortable when I had to announce commands verbally. This is also my problem with Siri and other voice-activated technology; who wants to be the crazy person speaking to a computer? At the time I suggested to the reps from Google that maybe they could have Glass read some kind of rudimentary sign language. Perhaps you could wear a ring or bracelet with a small accelerometer embedded that reads your movements and reports it to Glass. Yep, in my mind’s eye I was sorting through files like Tom Cruise in Minority Report. Then again, maybe looking like you’re conducting an invisible orchestra is just as crazy as speaking to an invisible computer assistant.
By the sound if it, Google Glass will have immediate competition in the wearable tech space from Apple and Samsung when it hits the wider market in a few months. As you’re undoubtedly aware, Apple has reportedly been testing 1.5-inch curved OLED screens that would be perfect for an “iWatch." It’s even started trademarking the name in many countries. And this spring, Samsung confirmed development of a smartwatch. From the rumors alone it sounds like the smartwatch concept could be a much more comfortable and acceptable apparatus to use, even if its form means it can’t offer the same level of interactivity.
The era of wearable tech that Google Glass and smartwatches are moving us into will be something like the smartphone market seven years ago; we will see wildly different takes on the idea that will filter down into a few tried and tested models that make sense for most people. The one rule I see dominating this emerging industry is that for wearable tech to really make sense it has to enhance our life, not complicate it or intrude upon it.

Google Glass: Getting In Your Face - Is Google Glass the future of wearable tech?

By Coco Rocha for PCMag

At the beginning of this year, Google asked me if I’d like to try out a prototype of Google Glass. Being a complete gadget junkie, I’d read all about them and was as excited as anyone to actually put them on. A future of augmented reality in the form of computer glasses has long been the dream of many a science fiction fan who imagines a world where information is superimposed into his vision, where his every move is documented and archived and thus no memory is ever lost and every experience can be relived. (That may also be a dream function for the NSA.)

Given time, Google Glass definitely has the potential to give us that fully augmented reality that so many have been asking for. But in answering that desire, it’s also brought up some new questions: will we still want it when we have it? Will it overwhelm and shorten our already-minute attention span? Will it make life chaotic or simplify it? And will its intrusion into our perceived privacy and personal space be a cultural issue? The debate has just begun, but so has the technology. From my hour or so with the prototype of Google Glass I got the feeling that it was sort of like the Wright brothers’ flying machine—that we still have a way to go before we get to something more like a Lear jet.

Read More

I’m thrilled to announce that I’m now the newest contributing editor to PCMag! It might seem a little strange to have a high fashion model write for a technology magazine, but I’m actually the kind of girl who’d rather buy a new tablet over a new pair of heels any day of the week. Hopefully in my column for PCMag you’ll see the ways I think the worlds of fashion and technology can and are coming together.

Shapeways Shifts Fashion - Coco Rocha for PCMag

The term 3D printing has always brought to my mind the fantastical, like the Star Trek food replicator, so I took a tour of Shapeways’ 3D printing factory last month for a firsthand look at what 3D printing is really all about.

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PCMag: What Do You Carry, Supermodel Coco Rocha?This week you’ll see the model on the runway at New York Fashion Week and on your TV on “The Face.” But every day, you’ll see her all across social mediaBy Chandra Steel
Model Coco Rocha is renowned in the fashion industry for her posing but when it comes to her professed love of technology, she’s clearly no poser.

Rocha is the undisputed ruler of social media among models. Tumblr, Instagram, Twitter,Facebook, Google+, Weibo, Pose, The Fancy,Viddy, Cinemagram, and, now, Vine—she’s everywhere. She’s also a gadget girl. So it’s fitting that Rocha, the face of many brands and a magazine cover regular, is clearly no stranger to the camera. She even reached out to the forward-thinking camera company Lytro to become better acquainted with its light-field technology camera after reading about it in a blog post. She later served as a judge for the company’s Light Field Photography Contest alongside tech writers and a photographer.
And just a few weeks back, Google invited her to try out Google Glass. “I was like a kid in a candy store!” Rocha told PCMag. “I think this technology will open up a whole array of possibilities to us that we had never dreamed of.”
Rocha knows something about new possibilities. “When I started modeling 10 years ago, there were no models with social media presence, there was no social media as we have it today,” she says. “Now I don’t think a model can expect to survive without it.”Click HERE to read more.

PCMag: What Do You Carry, Supermodel Coco Rocha?

This week you’ll see the model on the runway at New York Fashion Week and on your TV on “The Face.” But every day, you’ll see her all across social media

By Chandra Steel


Model Coco Rocha is renowned in the fashion industry for her posing but when it comes to her professed love of technology, she’s clearly no poser.

Rocha is the undisputed ruler of social media among models. TumblrInstagramTwitter,FacebookGoogle+, Weibo, PoseThe Fancy,Viddy, Cinemagram, and, now, Vine—she’s everywhere. She’s also a gadget girl. So it’s fitting that Rocha, the face of many brands and a magazine cover regular, is clearly no stranger to the camera. She even reached out to the forward-thinking camera company Lytro to become better acquainted with its light-field technology camera after reading about it in a blog post. She later served as a judge for the company’s Light Field Photography Contest alongside tech writers and a photographer.

And just a few weeks back, Google invited her to try out Google Glass. “I was like a kid in a candy store!” Rocha told PCMag. “I think this technology will open up a whole array of possibilities to us that we had never dreamed of.”

Rocha knows something about new possibilities. “When I started modeling 10 years ago, there were no models with social media presence, there was no social media as we have it today,” she says. “Now I don’t think a model can expect to survive without it.”

Click HERE to read more.

Time for another weekly installment of the random things I found on the interweb this week (If you missed last week’s, go HERE). xoxo Coco
Brought to you by the Queen of England, there will be a SPICE GIRLS REUNION! My friends always made me be Sporty Spice and I just wanted to be Posh - GO!
I’m going to show you a video of your future and it is going to blow your mind - GO!
Here’s an amazing guide to how you can be part of New York Fashion Week, all from the comfort of your own home (via Lauren at Mashable) - GO!
It’s 1984 all over again. Watch French Vogue’s editor-in-chief Emmanuelle Alt lip sync to Wham!’s “Wake Me Up Before You Go-Go,” with back-up dancers Anja Rubik, Karmen Pedaru, Jasmine Tookes and Kendra Spears - GO!
Lots of great press only one day after our newly-formed Model Alliance launch - GO! GO! and GO!
The MADE fashion week app by Milk Studios will change the way we experience fashion week forever. Read more at WWD or download for free from the App Store - GO!
"Mona Lisa’s Twin," a copy painted by Leonardo da Vinci’s student in 1503, unveiled in Madrid… and I like the copy better! - GO!
Linda Evangelista is on the latest cover of LOVE and I’m speechless - GO!

Time for another weekly installment of the random things I found on the interweb this week (If you missed last week’s, go HERE). xoxo Coco

  • Brought to you by the Queen of England, there will be a SPICE GIRLS REUNION! My friends always made me be Sporty Spice and I just wanted to be Posh - GO!
  • I’m going to show you a video of your future and it is going to blow your mind - GO!
  • Here’s an amazing guide to how you can be part of New York Fashion Week, all from the comfort of your own home (via Lauren at Mashable) - GO!
  • It’s 1984 all over again. Watch French Vogue’s editor-in-chief Emmanuelle Alt lip sync to Wham!’s “Wake Me Up Before You Go-Go,” with back-up dancers Anja Rubik, Karmen Pedaru, Jasmine Tookes and Kendra Spears - GO!
  • The MADE fashion week app by Milk Studios will change the way we experience fashion week forever. Read more at WWD or download for free from the App Store - GO!
  • "Mona Lisa’s Twin," a copy painted by Leonardo da Vinci’s student in 1503, unveiled in Madrid… and I like the copy better! - GO!
  • Linda Evangelista is on the latest cover of LOVE and I’m speechless - GO!