ZAC Zac Posen - Resort 2014
Resort 2014 marks the second season of my friend Zac Posen’s re-imagined diffusion line. I think style.com hit nail on the head when they described the collection as Zac “mixing traditional British haberdashery fabrics with silhouettes straight out of the bombshell fifties.” I loved the combination of feminine and masculine looks and, as last time, it’s always a fun day on set with Zac and Christopher. To see more, go to Style.com.

ZAC Zac Posen - Resort 2014

Resort 2014 marks the second season of my friend Zac Posen’s re-imagined diffusion line. I think style.com hit nail on the head when they described the collection as Zac “mixing traditional British haberdashery fabrics with silhouettes straight out of the bombshell fifties.” I loved the combination of feminine and masculine looks and, as last time, it’s always a fun day on set with Zac and Christopher. To see more, go to Style.com.

After Backlash, Instagram CEO Promises Your Photos Will Not Be Used in Ads

RACKED.COM
Wednesday, December 19, 2012, by 
Kerry Folan

After grumblings from the media and Instagram users yesterday, Instagram CEO and founder Kevin Systrom says the company will remove language from the service’s new terms of use that stated Instagram would allow user pictures to be used in advertising, Mashable reports.

The new terms, announced late Monday night, forced users to give Instagram “a non-exclusive, fully paid and royalty-free, transferable, sub-licensable, worldwide license to use the Content that you post on or through the Service.” Instagram isn’t claiming copyright or ownership of your arty selfies, but they do get to use them however they like, without your permission and without compensating you for use. The only opt out would have been to delete your Instagram account.

Yesterday saw a mini backlash from the fashion community. Style.com reportsthat industry heavyweights such as Nina Garcia and Coco Rocha, two of the most powerful presences in fashion social media, took to their respective platforms to vocalize their complaints.

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Coco Rocha wrote a piece on her Tumblr blog titled “Instagram—World’s Worst Modeling/Photography Agency?” where she declared, “As a model, I’m horrified by Instagram’s proposed new terms of service. As a human being I’m outraged.”

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Nina Garcia also weighed in with the tweet above.

In response to the negative feedback, Systrom posted a retraction of sorts on Instagram’s blog in a post titled “Thank you and We’re Listening

From the start, Instagram was created to become a business. Advertising is one of many ways that Instagram can become a self-sustaining business, but not the only one. Our intention in updating the terms was to communicate that we’d like to experiment with innovative advertising that feels appropriate on Instagram. Instead it was interpreted by many that we were going to sell your photos to others without any compensation. This is not true and it is our mistake that this language is confusing. To be clear: it is not our intention to sell your photos. We are working on updated language in the terms to make sure this is clear.

As Mashable points out, the updated terms were actually pretty darn clear, stating explicitly "you agree that a business or other entity may pay us to display your username, likeness, photos (along with any associated metadata), and/or actions you take, in connection with paid or sponsored content or promotions, without any compensation to you."

But the quick response and the promise to change the terms should go a long way to sooth everyone’s ruffled feathers.


Ch-ch-ch-ch-changes… Style.com did some detective work and noticed something different about me last night:"While some of us prepare for dark autumnal hair-color transitions (we  typically try to go almost black this time of year to better contrast  with our olive skin when it takes a turn for the pale and pasty), Coco  Rocha is bucking the trend and lightening up instead. The model, who  cashed in her brunette locks for a shade of fiery red a few years ago  before returning to brown, seems to be edging her way into auburn  territory. Rocha turned up at last night’s WGSN Global Fashion Awards in  New York with middle-parted strands that were tinted a ruddy chestnut.  It’s subtle, but could signal a bigger transition to come (these things  take time, you know). Which hue do you think works best for her? - Style.com”

Ch-ch-ch-ch-changes… Style.com did some detective work and noticed something different about me last night:

"While some of us prepare for dark autumnal hair-color transitions (we typically try to go almost black this time of year to better contrast with our olive skin when it takes a turn for the pale and pasty), Coco Rocha is bucking the trend and lightening up instead. The model, who cashed in her brunette locks for a shade of fiery red a few years ago before returning to brown, seems to be edging her way into auburn territory. Rocha turned up at last night’s WGSN Global Fashion Awards in New York with middle-parted strands that were tinted a ruddy chestnut. It’s subtle, but could signal a bigger transition to come (these things take time, you know). Which hue do you think works best for her? - Style.com


FREE COCO - By Darrell Hartman for style.comPhoto: Coco Rocha’s InstagramCoco Rocha is spending some quality time in New York this summer—but  not necessarily by choice. “I’m actually stuck here in the States for  two months. We’re in the midst of my green card application,” the  Vancouver native told us last night at a rooftop party at David Yurman’s  offices. It’s not quite the same as house arrest, but if you’re used to  jetting around as much as this particular international fashion model,  it can probably start to feel like it. Rocha and her husband, James  Conran, smartly squeezed in trips to Tulum and Argentina before the  travel restriction took effect. “If I want to work, I have to leave  sometimes,” Rocha said. Now, she joked, “I feel like I’m not allowed to  leave my couch. Everyone has to come see me.”She’s  hoping to have her wings again by September, when she plans to take a  Haiti documentary she filmed with Behati Prinsloo up to Toronto. If her  status hasn’t changed by then, Rocha said, “I’m supposed to plead with  the government to allow me out.” Word of advice, fair Coco: Try to make  your case in person.

FREE COCO - By Darrell Hartman for style.com
Photo: Coco Rocha’s Instagram

Coco Rocha is spending some quality time in New York this summer—but not necessarily by choice. “I’m actually stuck here in the States for two months. We’re in the midst of my green card application,” the Vancouver native told us last night at a rooftop party at David Yurman’s offices. It’s not quite the same as house arrest, but if you’re used to jetting around as much as this particular international fashion model, it can probably start to feel like it. Rocha and her husband, James Conran, smartly squeezed in trips to Tulum and Argentina before the travel restriction took effect. “If I want to work, I have to leave sometimes,” Rocha said. Now, she joked, “I feel like I’m not allowed to leave my couch. Everyone has to come see me.”

She’s hoping to have her wings again by September, when she plans to take a Haiti documentary she filmed with Behati Prinsloo up to Toronto. If her status hasn’t changed by then, Rocha said, “I’m supposed to plead with the government to allow me out.” Word of advice, fair Coco: Try to make your case in person.