L’Officiel Singapore - September 2014

I posted the two covers last week, now here’s the full 1960’s inspired editorial and interview! Photos by Chaundo & Frey, Stylying by Jack Wang & Jumius Wong, Hair by Roberto di Cuia and Makeup by Nigel Sanislaus.

INTERVIEW

"Whatever I do, I want to do it well. I don’t want to, say, go into acting just because 
that’s the next thing to do; I want to learn how to be really good at it. “ Explains Rocha. A recent collaboration with accessories label BaubleBar proves her eye for statement-making costume jewelry – think show-stealing necklaces with huge crystals and stones or a row of pearls on a ear cuff. What’s next on the list? 

Affectionately dubbed the “Queen of Posing”, she has amazed one and all with her ability to hit poses in quick succession. Her record so far? One hundred and sixty poses per minute. Back in 2003, Rocha was a 14-year-old girl who had devoted half her life to dance when Charles Stuart (owner of acclaimed model management agency in Vancouver, Charles Stuart International Models) spotted her during an Irish dance competition. The Canadian girl spent a few months in Singapore and Taipei building a portfolio before moving to New York to work on an exclusive six-month stint with photographer Steven Meisel (whom the industry knows as the ‘model maker’). She left an indelible impression on the fashion industry when she Irish-jigged her way down the runway of Jean Paul Gaultier (Fall-Winter ’07), which led to it being remembered as the ‘Coco Moment’. “I attribute my success to them [Steven Meisel and Jean Paul Gaultier],”shares Rocha.

While Rocha describes Manhattan as the city with “so much going on that I have to live slightly outside of it”, she now resides in Westchester with husband, James Conran. They both work from home (“I love days where I stay in in my pajamas and just watch Netflix,” says the 26-year-old) and make the occasional jaunts to Manhattan to catch up with friends, for photo shoots, and various meetings for her soon-to-be-published book, Study of Pose, which is due out this October.

Conceptualized and photographed by Steven Sebring, the book contains 1,000 poses executed by Rocha; it was a challenge thrown by the photographer whom she had met at a dinner party in 2010. At that time, Sebring was developing a unique system, called The Rig, that he felt could revolutionize fashion photography. He described it as “the fourth dimension”, an experimental form of photography that, in a nutshell, works very much like the “bullet time” shots made famous in the Matrix. While a technical explanation would not do this process justice, Rocha explains, “It’s almost as if the technology makes movement seem tangible and the energy of the pose truly alive. Steven said he couldn’t find a anyone he thought was capable of doing one thousand poses which sounded like a challenge to me. I love a good challenge.”

“By using The Rig for this project, the concept of capturing 1,000 poses became much more contemporary, educational and interactive than I ever could have dreamed,” explains Sebring. Every shot of Rocha in the traditionally printed book is available in its 360-degree digital glory (which can be accessed when you buy its digital book), where every pose can be viewed and studied in great detail from one hundred different, seamless angles. “It was me in the middle and a hundred cameras all around me,” Rocha recalls the creative process.

How did you fall in love with dancing? 

I loved to perform when I was young, and I still do. Music always inspires me while modeling – it brings me back to performing. I put 110% into it and I think everyone gets more creative when they see someone else perform.

How, do you think, your background in dancing has helped you advance in modeling?

I think models that used to dance are generally better models. They are less nervous under the watchful eye of the camera and they know how to use their body. In my new book, you’ll see how different types of dance are used as inspiration. To know and understand your body is very important, it helps you to see what an angle looks like without having to look at the photo. In dance, you are trained to position your hand or curve your body in a certain way without looking at it.

What do you wish to achieve through this book?

There are a few messages. One is to educate younger models and people who think modeling is easy. It’s a portfolio of poses and a proof of how complex and nuanced it can be. On the other hand, it is supposed to be funny. A book of a thousand poses – that’s a funny thing! For artists and sculptors out there, the digital version allows you to have a 360-degree view of the poses. It’s like seeing a thousand ways the body moves and really is a different way of looking at art. The biggest thing that I’m excited about is the fact this is the first book of its kind. This is the dictionary for modeling and I doubt anyone else will attempt this. It’s interesting. Either you will laugh at it, or be inspired by it. I hope both!

You mentioned in Study of Pose, “I would be lying if I said I didn’t hit a few walls in the three days we shot this book.” What were the main challenges faced? 

Trying to find a thousand was definitely a challenge. I kept questioning myself, “Did I already do that pose?” My husband and Steven were throwing out inspiration like ‘Marilyn Monroe’ and ‘Michael Jackson’ to coach me into new poses. There were no props, it was just me. It was quite daunting and more than a few times I wondered if I even had it in me to come up with 1000.

How many poses were shot before shortlisting it to 1,000?

Maybe around 1,050. You can’t really go any further than that, or at least I couldn’t!

You’ve been an inspiration to aspiring models. What words of advice do you have for them?

It’s important they learn how to build confidence. Nine years ago, I didn’t have the confidence to move. Photographers had to move me. We’re there to inspire. A lot of girls are very nervous about being judged on how they move. On the other hand I think over confidence and arrogance can be an issue for young models. I’ve always lived by the mantra “It’s nice to be important, but it’s important to be nice”.

Revolution by Steven Sebring featuring Coco Rocha.
“When people come in they don’t see the techincal part of it. They see the organicness of it and I think that’s the success of it.” -Steven Sebring
“Revolution” is on view from May 21 to May 23 at the 69th Regiment Armory, 68 Lexington Avenue, New York; sebringrevolution.com

Revolution by Steven Sebring 
featuring Coco Rocha.

“When people come in they don’t see the techincal part of it. They see the organicness of it and I think that’s the success of it.” -Steven Sebring

“Revolution” is on view from May 21 to May 23 at the 69th Regiment Armory, 68 Lexington Avenue, New York; sebringrevolution.com

(via romanticnaturalism-deactivated2)


T MAGAZINE - Steven Sebring’s Fourth-Dimensional Perspective
“It’s dope, isn’t it?” asked Steven Sebring in his Lower Manhattan studio. He was gazing at what he calls the Rig, a 10.5-by-15-foot igloo-like silver contraption (or “geodome”) designed to capture the form and movement of the subject standing inside from every imaginable angle. Sebring, a fashion photographer and award-winning filmmaker, used the device to create “Revolution,” a three-year effort on display for three days at the 69th Regiment Armory. The multimedia exhibition pays simultaneous tribute to the 19th-century English photographer Eadweard Muybridge and to Marcel Duchamp, whose abstract classic “Nude Descending a Staircase, No. 2″ drew inspiration from Muybridge’s pioneering stop-motion imagery. The device contains 100 synchronized cameras that shoot in predetermined sequences, allowing Sebring to capture form and movement from numerous perspectives simultaneously — for example, his muse, Coco Rocha, spinning and dancing (as seen in “Discovery,” the first clip above). He can then present the results in numerous forms, including film, photographs and sculpture.
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“Revolution,” which Sebring financed through his fashion photography for such companies as M.A.C. and Coach, is a technical quantum leap from his previous film project, the excellent but conventional Patti Smith documentary “Dream of Life.” The genesis for the project came to him while he was studying “a way to photograph humans as art,” explained the usually secretive artist, dressed in his signature brown fedora and heavy black horn-rims. “This is a true collision of Muybridge and Duchamp. It’s a vision — or video — of the minds of those artists.” He describes it as a peek into the fourth dimension because of the way it allows viewers to experience a singular moment in time from multiple viewpoints. “If people say this isn’t the fourth dimension — then show me it. Because nobody’s ever seen it before.”
Visitors to the armory will encounter 25 works of photography, sculpture and film that use Sebring’s technology. The exhibition comes 100 years after Duchamp scandalized American audiences at the legendary 1913 Armory Show with the stateside debut of “Nude Descending a Staircase, No. 2,” and Sebring wouldn’t object if his work elicits a similar reaction. “The possibilities are monstrous,” he exclaimed. “This could change the future of fashion photography. Why would anyone want to see flat portraits anymore?” Whatever happens when expected guests like Patti Smith, Donna Karan, Delphine and Reed Krakoff, Johan Lindberg, and Coco Rocha descend upon the official opening of “Revolution” on Wednesday evening, Sebring will be enjoying himself. “I’m just going to step back and watch,” he said with a puckish grin. “I’ll be a complete voyeur.”
“Revolution” is on view from May 21 to May 23 at the 69th Regiment Armory, 68 Lexington Avenue, New York; sebringrevolution.com.

T MAGAZINE - Steven Sebring’s Fourth-Dimensional Perspective

“It’s dope, isn’t it?” asked Steven Sebring in his Lower Manhattan studio. He was gazing at what he calls the Rig, a 10.5-by-15-foot igloo-like silver contraption (or “geodome”) designed to capture the form and movement of the subject standing inside from every imaginable angle. Sebring, a fashion photographer and award-winning filmmaker, used the device to create “Revolution,” a three-year effort on display for three days at the 69th Regiment Armory. The multimedia exhibition pays simultaneous tribute to the 19th-century English photographer Eadweard Muybridge and to Marcel Duchamp, whose abstract classic “Nude Descending a Staircase, No. 2″ drew inspiration from Muybridge’s pioneering stop-motion imagery. The device contains 100 synchronized cameras that shoot in predetermined sequences, allowing Sebring to capture form and movement from numerous perspectives simultaneously — for example, his muse, Coco Rocha, spinning and dancing (as seen in “Discovery,” the first clip above). He can then present the results in numerous forms, including film, photographs and sculpture.

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LIFE VIA INSTAGRAM - May 1st - 14th

In this "Life Via Instagram" I attend my friend Katherina Harf’s yearly DKMS Gala, get to sit front row at the incredible American Ballet Theater opening night and end up in Singapore!

  1. With Vera Wang and Anja Rubik at tonight’s DKMS gala. Such an inspirational event!
  2. At the DKMS Delete Blood Cancer Gala listening to the amazing Katherina Harf. Silhouette of Katy Perry!
  3. Everyone subscribed to the COCO X FANCY BOX this month got a $130 TKO watch and much more! Don’t miss out on all the goodies every month! Subscribe here: http://t.co/3gpJJsRois.
  4. Orange you glad to see me?
  5. Can you guess where I was shooting today?
  6. Chatting with Steven Sebring and V Magazine about the unbelievable upcoming exhibition: www.SebringRevolution.com.
  7. Descending stairs in Zac Posen before the American Ballet Theater opening night gala!
  8. My look for the American Ballet Theater opening night Spring gala at Lincoln Center. Gown by Zac Posen, jewelry by Dannijo!
  9. Admiring the rising sun in Singapore. (at Changi International Airport)

LIFE via INSTAGRAM - June 20th - 30th, 2012.

  1. Working with Steven Sebring and admiring the crazy Lady Gaga hair he has on display!
  2. Heading to Rome decked out in Longchamp travel gear - one of the perks of being the campaign girl
  3. Spent the weekend in Italy in idyllic little towns between Rome and Siena.
  4. My look for last night’s “People Like Us” premiere in NYC. It was a really sweet and heartwarming movie, based on an amazing true story!
  5. My face (and hair) when I discovered Instagram was FINALLY BACK ONLINE!!!
  6. Verdict: My face really confuses the aLike app.