Coco Rocha Has Opinions on Modeling, Social Media, and Photoshop—and You Should Hear Them - It’s almost unfair for supermodels to be this cool.by Marianne Dabir for Teen Vogue 
Although Coco Rocha is a supermodel first and foremost, she’s also become ubiquitous both in and out of the fashion industry thanks to her outgoing personality, social media smarts, and yes, that famous face. Just days before she helped change New York labor laws to protect underage models, she spoke with Teen Vogue Fashion U students about her early start as a model, how she keeps it real, and the motivation behind her buzzed-about haircut. Read on for some of the best bits of her seminar, and check back tomorrow for more Fashion U highlights.Like many young models, she struggled to maintain her own sense of self when she first started out."I wish I could go back in time and tell the 15-year-old Coco that she was allowed to say ‘no,’" she says. "But when you’re working with major industry moguls who say they can make or break your career, it’s extremely nerve-wracking to go against what they want." But over time, Coco learned that staying true to herself was important—and she didn’t have to sacrifice her career to do so.Social media has given Coco—and many other models—a voice."Back when I started 10 years ago, you couldn’t really tell one girl from the other," she says. "We all looked alike, and therefore we were very replaceable." Not so much anymore. "These days, even the new girl on the block has a Twitter, Instagram, and a blog, and if she’s being mistreated she can write about it.” When Coco started her own blog a few years ago, she was one of the first models on the social media scene—and it wasn’t always well-received. “Someone in the industry once told me that I wasn’t supposed to be speaking out that much,” she remembers. “And I remember feeling really excited, because obviously I was on to something.”
[[MORE]]
And now she’s a bonafide social media star.
"My biggest tip is to make sure whatever you put out there is worthwhile," she points out. "On Instagram, I don’t want to see your toes, tongue, or food." Her major social following—over half a million on Instagram alone—comes from making each post is special. "People tend to just to take a photo, add a filter, and be done with it, but that’s not how you get the likes and the followers," she says. "For me, one ‘gram is a half-hour process!"When it comes to her beauty regimen, she does things her own way.The model recently underwent a major hair overhaul, chopping off her long locks in favor of a chic, short undercut. “It was a little daunting to change my look so much, because people in the industry tend to think that ‘reinventing’ yourself means your career isn’t doing well,” she explains. “But my hair was so dead from all the dyeing and heat styling—I just needed a haircut!” And she’s equally honest about how she maintains her flawless face, admitting that she’s “the worst” about taking care of her skin. “I get freckles, pimples, and bags under my eyes.” But how does it always look so perfect? “Photoshop!” she laughs.Above all, it’s important to be realistic about the industry—and to be humble, too."We have to realize that fashion is a bit of a fairytale," she says. "Sometimes I’ll see myself in a picture and think, ‘Whoa! I wish I looked like that! Truthfully, the photos we produce are often not the real thing." And what about the idea that getting ahead means being a major diva? "That’s a huge misconception—in order to succeed, you absolutely cannot make people feel like they’re worthless," she says. "I try to remember that it’s nice to be important but more important to be nice—that belief has served me very well, and helped me stay grounded."Photo: Spencer Wolhrab

Coco Rocha Has Opinions on Modeling, Social Media, and Photoshop—and You Should Hear Them - It’s almost unfair for supermodels to be this cool.

by Marianne Dabir for Teen Vogue 

Although Coco Rocha is a supermodel first and foremost, she’s also become ubiquitous both in and out of the fashion industry thanks to her outgoing personality, social media smarts, and yes, that famous face. Just days before she helped change New York labor laws to protect underage models, she spoke with Teen Vogue Fashion U students about her early start as a model, how she keeps it real, and the motivation behind her buzzed-about haircut. Read on for some of the best bits of her seminar, and check back tomorrow for more Fashion U highlights.

Like many young models, she struggled to maintain her own sense of self when she first started out.

"I wish I could go back in time and tell the 15-year-old Coco that she was allowed to say ‘no,’" she says. "But when you’re working with major industry moguls who say they can make or break your career, it’s extremely nerve-wracking to go against what they want." But over time, Coco learned that staying true to herself was important—and she didn’t have to sacrifice her career to do so.

Social media has given Coco—and many other models—a voice.

"Back when I started 10 years ago, you couldn’t really tell one girl from the other," she says. "We all looked alike, and therefore we were very replaceable." Not so much anymore. "These days, even the new girl on the block has a Twitter, Instagram, and a blog, and if she’s being mistreated she can write about it.” When Coco started her own blog a few years ago, she was one of the first models on the social media scene—and it wasn’t always well-received. “Someone in the industry once told me that I wasn’t supposed to be speaking out that much,” she remembers. “And I remember feeling really excited, because obviously I was on to something.”

Read More

How Supermodels Took Over the World (Again)by Mike Albo For GLAMOUR MAGAZINE

They tweet. They post selfies. They have more fans than many of Hollywood’s biggest celebs. So how exactly did Karlie, Coco, Cara, and company do it? Like this.
[[MORE]]
This past May the entire fashion galaxy convened at the annual Metropolitan Museum of Art’s Costume Institute gala in New York City. All the usual A-listers were there, of course: Gwyneth, Madonna, Beyoncé, and more. But many of the world’s top models were there too, drawing as much red-carpet attention as the Hollywood crowd—and sharing the whole scene with the world.
Canadian model Coco Rocha, the 24-year-old coach of the modeling competition show The Face, quickly took a selfie in the graffiti-bedecked bathroom and posted it for her million-plus followers. Fashion favorite and new Victoria’s Secret Angel Karlie Kloss, 21, posted a shot of a friend’s tattooed knuckles that read PUNK THIS, and her 259,000 Instagram fans fist-bumped back. Twenty-two-year-old runway pro Chanel Iman photographed a moment with Taylor Swift. And, not to be outdone, no-holds-barred British It Girl and model Cara Delevingne, 21, snapped herself kissing actress Sienna Miller, wearing a matching spiked dress. By the next morning that lip lock had amassed 60,000 likes on Instagram. “Cara is a stud,” proclaimed @jabber1174.
Check your iPhone, laptop, or television. After several years of silence, supermodels are, well, super again. Runway staples like Delevingne, Kloss, and Rocha are now legitimate media stars, many with TV shows and allwith ardent followers who, say, watch the live-streamed Burberry or Calvin Klein show and then congratulate the girls on Twitter. And guess what: This new crop of supermodels is talking back—and that’s making them more real, more relatable, more likeable.
“This generation knows how to start the conversation and build a career,” says Ivan Bart, senior vice president and managing director of IMG Models, who manages the careers of the entrepreneurially minded runway stars Kloss and Gisele Bündchen. “I think this is the greatest time in the history of modeling.”
First, a little history…
Back in the eighties and nineties, the original supermodels— Linda Evangelista, Cindy Crawford, Naomi Campbell, and Christy Turlington—created a global sensation. They dated rock stars and dominated the magazine newsstand. “You saw a model even in silhouette on the runway and knew exactly who she was,” recalls Tyra Banks, the mega mogul, talk-show host, and creator of America’s Next Top Model, who came on the scene in the nineties. Women everywhere loved them (and maybe hated them a little too).
Yet models of the era say it was easy to be seen in those days— but not easy to be heard. “Your job back then was to show up and put clothes on and show those clothes as best you could,” says Crawford. The irony was that, although she and her crew exuded power and beauty, they recall being discouraged from breaking any actual new ground. Crawford, a five-time Glamour cover girl, says her agents told her that hosting MTV’s House of Style would be a waste of time. That was 1989. “There was no fashion on TV back then,” she says.
Crawford did host that show, but it took decades for her entrepreneurial spirit to catch on. For years—save for Banks, Bündchen, and Kate Moss—models were almost anonymous, with a fresh crop every year. “Girls weren’t popping,” says Banks. “They were famous in Paris only. I think it’s important for someone in the middle of America to know your name and face, and it wasn’t happening.”
Newsflash: Models are people.
Now they’re unique and known. “Karlie is this six-foot-one- and-a-half giant gorgeous alien,” Banks says, assessing the new stars. “Cara is the naughty girl next door. Coco is beautiful but approachable. They are all distinct and themselves. Models used to be silent movie actresses, but not anymore.”
Banks herself deserves a lot of the credit for this trend. Dubbed the “model mogul” by the Wall Street Journal, she transformed herself into a brand, complete with television shows and a book deal. Following Banks’ lead, the average model these days takes her off-the-runway career seriously: Floridian bombshell Kate Upton built her own fan base on YouTube before getting the cover of Sports Illustrated. Kloss and model Joan Smalls are cohosting the new House of Style reboot. Rocha’s got The Face with Campbell and Karolina Kurkova. (For any of you model-IQ doubters, Rocha is also a contributing editor for PC Magazine.) And our cover girl, Rosie Huntington-Whiteley, has recently gone the model- turned-actress route. “You no longer have to be defined by one thing,” she says.
Wait: we like them now?
Truth is, models used to be easy for women to resent. They were seen as gorgeous, pouty giraffes who, as Evangelista once famously said, didn’t “wake up for less than $10,000 a day.” Actresses, on the other hand, were shorter and maybe even freckled. Relatable. That’s changed: These days many Hollywood stars guard their privacy carefully, while models come off as less cautious, more real. You can smile along with Joan Smalls as she posts yet another cute photo of her childhood outfits for #throwbackthursday; you’re right there when a bird poops on Delevingne’s bushy brows (true story!) or when Kloss photobombs Steve Carell at the MTV Movie Awards.
“Nowadays, personality counts just as much as looks,” says Lorenzo Martone, a New York City–based manager and publicist. Author and fashion blogger Derek Blasberg agrees: The new supes have to be relatable. It might even be a part of their job. “Yes, people still want gorgeous models with a traffic-stopping walk,” he says. “But a girl today needs to have a big laugh, a big heart, and a good story.”
They’ve found their voice.
Rocha figured out her story five years ago. “It was during the backlash of the supermodel,” she remembers. “You didn’t know our names, and we all kind of looked alike.” So she started a blog. “I thought I was just going to mention mundane things to colleagues and friends. Then I noticed I was getting traffic. I realized I had to have personality. I didn’t want to just be known for my cheekbones. I have a voice.” (In one much-read post, she criticized the industry for its body- image issues: “I’m six inches taller and 10 sizes smaller than the average American woman. Yet in another parallel universe, I am considered ‘fat.’ ”)
Rocha’s blog graduated to a Twitter handle. Then she added a Tumblr page. Now she’s got a Vine identity and a global brand boasting more than 4 million followers on Chinese social-networking sites. “Social media helped my career,” Rocha says. “People would say, ‘We want that girl. She’s got sparkle.’”
Then there’s rising star Delevingne, who drives the tabloids wild by hanging with Rihanna or spilling out of a car with Harry Styles. The most candid of the group, she labels herself on Twitter a “pro- fessional human being” and will post photos between shoots or talk directly to her best friend, pop star Rita Ora, whom she calls “wifey.” In a recent interview Delevingne explained that her followers make her feel “less alone.” Modeling, she says, can be “a really lonely job.”
Ultimately, what many models want today is the right to control their own future: Kloss is launching a new line of jeans for tall women; her charity project Karlie’s Kookies gives money to FEED, to fight hunger. Others are using their clout to shake up their industry for the better. (Watch model Cameron Russell’s TED Talk.
The “genetic lottery” winner had this advice for young women: Don’t try to model; instead, “be the next president.”) But sometimes these women are just looking out for their fans. “You guys are hysterical!” Delevingne responded recently to kids who tweeted her from school. “Get back to work. I will not be blamed for doing badly in exams!”
What’s next? Pretty much anything, says Banks. “It’s their time,” she shrugs. “The choice to do more is in these girls’ hands.” No doubt their decision will be posted.

How Supermodels Took Over the World (Again)
by Mike Albo For GLAMOUR MAGAZINE

They tweet. They post selfies. They have more fans than many of Hollywood’s biggest celebs. So how exactly did Karlie, Coco, Cara, and company do it? Like this.

Read More


Coco Rocha Reveals Her Technology Tips -  Vogue Australia (photo by Ben Cope)What are your five tips for creating and maintaining a social media presence?1. Don’t have just anyone run your social media. I think it’s insane when brands or celebrities relegate their social media to an intern or someone who does not know them well. 2. Be consistent. Your audience wants to hear from you regularly but not too regularly. People have no problem clicking “unfollow” if they feel you’re over saturating their feed.3. If you’re using platforms like Pinterest don’t try to be a curator of everything under the sun. Know your own personal forte. We have all heard the saying “Jack of all trades, master of none”. Your followers will accept you as a taste expert and authority on a certain subject, but they will not believe you as an expert on everything.4. If you’re posting pictures to platforms like Instagram or Twitter, be selective about the one you post. If I’m capturing a sunset I’ll take at least 10 pictures, I’ll then filter them using other apps, enhance them, then I really pick the best image of perhaps 30. No one wants to follow someone who does not take pride in composing an aesthetically beautiful picture. No random snapshots, treat every upload as if it were a work of art.5. Be current. Know and comment on current trends and news. Don’t be the last one entering a conversation. You’re across so many different social media platforms. What are your favourite features of each one?
[[MORE]]I definitely get more feedback from Instagram than any other platform. I think it’s well suited to my line of work because at its most basic, fashion is a visual experience.Tumblr has become this great aggregate of fashion and photography. What Myspace was to music, Tumblr has become to fashion, a place to watch and to be seen. Tumblr is all about images, and sharing those images. Nowhere else on the web does a beautiful piece of clothing, an amazing editorial or a stunning campaign more than 25,000 times and yet that’s not just because I am a publically known person - with Tumblr, if an image is great, whether it was created by Karl Lagerfeld or the girl next door, the cream rises to the top.Twitter has been a great tool for networking. In the past in order to reach out to someone else in the industry with a question or idea you’d have to go through your agent or publicist to reach their publicist to hopefully deliver the message within a few weeks.  Now it’s instantaneous and I have all kinds of interesting conversations and relationships thanks to Twitter.A new platform I’m loving is TheFancy.com which shows you what you’re looking for before you even know you’re looking for it! You are treated to an endless stream of lust-worthy products, all of which can be purchased either on the Fancy or a third party site. It’s the first social media platform I know of that is, off the bat, looking to drive commerce.  I just started my own subscription box there where people can subscribe to a box of items that I curate every month, here. How do you think technology is impacting fashion and the retail industry?For a long time I think fashion was seen as this untouchable world only for the elite. The industry as a whole is embracing social media, and that is proof that the pendulum is now swinging away from that attitude. More than ever people want to be, and in many cases, expect to be a part of this world and I’m happy to have been here to usher in a more inclusive attitude from within the industry. I think there is a huge opportunity for technology to impact the fashion industry in the way we create and also view supply and demand - that’s actually a topic I will be speaking on at the Bespoke summit at Sydney Opera House on May 16! I hope you can come!
What are the key components of creating a genuine personal brand?It really is almost a full-time job but I don’t do it alone, my husband helps me enormously.  Had I not had his help I probably would have had to close down some of my accounts since there are just not enough hours in the day to manage them all.  It’s important that we keep it in the family though. Personally, even though I have a great PR team no one except my husband and I touch any of my 10 social media accounts. It’s a lot of work but I know that my brand, my image and my voice are authentic to me. What are your favourite technological devices or gadgets?When I leave my house I always grab my iPhone and my iPad mini - those hold my entire world! The iPad mini is so light and easy to manage and most importantly it fits in my purses!
How do you stay organised – software, apps or a hard-copy notebook?My husband and I sync our worlds together across our iPhones, tablets and computers using “the cloud”. If he makes an appointment, I see it. If I add a contact, he sees it. It has been really great for us as we are such busy people. Aside from that there is one app I’m really loving lately called Uber. Getting a taxi in New York can be a nightmare but Uber updates the whole process in a wonderful way providing everything you need on a mobile-based app. On the app you set your pick-up location and get to see, in real time, which cars are in the area. You can literally watch the car travel towards you on GPS. You don’t need cash or a credit card, just pay for the whole thing using the app. I took a car to the airport the other day and the whole process could not have been easier!

Coco Rocha Reveals Her Technology Tips -  Vogue Australia 
(photo by Ben Cope)


What are your five tips for creating and maintaining a social media presence?

1. Don’t have just anyone run your social media. I think it’s insane when brands or celebrities relegate their social media to an intern or someone who does not know them well. 

2. Be consistent. Your audience wants to hear from you regularly but not too regularly. People have no problem clicking “unfollow” if they feel you’re over saturating their feed.

3. If you’re using platforms like Pinterest don’t try to be a curator of everything under the sun. Know your own personal forte. We have all heard the saying “Jack of all trades, master of none”. Your followers will accept you as a taste expert and authority on a certain subject, but they will not believe you as an expert on everything.

4. If you’re posting pictures to platforms like Instagram or Twitter, be selective about the one you post. If I’m capturing a sunset I’ll take at least 10 pictures, I’ll then filter them using other apps, enhance them, then I really pick the best image of perhaps 30. No one wants to follow someone who does not take pride in composing an aesthetically beautiful picture. No random snapshots, treat every upload as if it were a work of art.

5. Be current. Know and comment on current trends and news. Don’t be the last one entering a conversation. 

You’re across so many different social media platforms. What are your favourite features of each one?

Read More

WHY I INSTAGRAM - By Coco Rocha for Vogue
Around 2006 I began noticing the photographers waiting outside runway shows were beginning to outnumber those actually working inside. They were shooting our “model-off-duty” looks and plastering them all over the Internet, where they garnered as much interest and discussion as the campaigns and editorials in which we star. 
These days everyone is his or her own street-style photographer, myself included. As a model in the digital age, the ability to reach an audience outside of the traditional magazine ad and billboard realm is increasingly important to me and my clients who realize we live in a new world of far more social networking- and endorsement-based advertising—from what your friend in school “likes” on Facebook to what your favorite top model wears in her downtime. I use platforms including Instagram, Tumblr, and Pose on a near daily basis to document my own looks for my almost ten million followers worldwide. The responses to my posts are always a gauge of how well I did with my personal styling. A picture that garners 30,000 likes versus one that only gets 5,000 says a lot about where I hit and miss in capturing the fashion zeitgeist. (Surprisingly the pics of just me at home usually get more likes than the ones of me with celebrities or designers.) The only time I get negative feedback is when I post a look containing fur, so now that definitely crosses my mind before I post an image to social media. While I believe everyone must make up his or her own mind, I don’t like to unnecessarily act insensitive to my followers.
Often I’ll have my husband, James, take a few dozen pictures with his phone and then we will edit them until we’ve found the most aesthetically pleasing and interesting image. After that, we filter the pictures using a host of iPhone apps like Camera+, Pictwo, and Snapseed before we decide the image is ready for posting. Selections are always about quality versus quantity. There is no formula as to exactly how many photos I Instagram per day; one day I may post a single shot, where other days I may put up a dozen. I try to share sneak peeks of events I attend, behind the scenes moments at photoshoots, or anything I witness that I think my followers would find interesting. 
Models are never really “off duty” anymore, and I view social media as an extension of my career as a whole. Sometimes posting can feel like a chore and in those cases I view it as a necessary part of my work, but other times it’s genuinely fun to share and document my life with friends far and wide. It’s the way of the 21st-century girl.
See our slideshow above featuring our favorite Coco Rocha Instagrams.

WHY I INSTAGRAM - By Coco Rocha for Vogue

Around 2006 I began noticing the photographers waiting outside runway shows were beginning to outnumber those actually working inside. They were shooting our “model-off-duty” looks and plastering them all over the Internet, where they garnered as much interest and discussion as the campaigns and editorials in which we star. 

These days everyone is his or her own street-style photographer, myself included. As a model in the digital age, the ability to reach an audience outside of the traditional magazine ad and billboard realm is increasingly important to me and my clients who realize we live in a new world of far more social networking- and endorsement-based advertising—from what your friend in school “likes” on Facebook to what your favorite top model wears in her downtime. I use platforms including Instagram, Tumblr, and Pose on a near daily basis to document my own looks for my almost ten million followers worldwide. The responses to my posts are always a gauge of how well I did with my personal styling. A picture that garners 30,000 likes versus one that only gets 5,000 says a lot about where I hit and miss in capturing the fashion zeitgeist. (Surprisingly the pics of just me at home usually get more likes than the ones of me with celebrities or designers.) The only time I get negative feedback is when I post a look containing fur, so now that definitely crosses my mind before I post an image to social media. While I believe everyone must make up his or her own mind, I don’t like to unnecessarily act insensitive to my followers.

Often I’ll have my husband, James, take a few dozen pictures with his phone and then we will edit them until we’ve found the most aesthetically pleasing and interesting image. After that, we filter the pictures using a host of iPhone apps like Camera+, Pictwo, and Snapseed before we decide the image is ready for posting. Selections are always about quality versus quantity. There is no formula as to exactly how many photos I Instagram per day; one day I may post a single shot, where other days I may put up a dozen. I try to share sneak peeks of events I attend, behind the scenes moments at photoshoots, or anything I witness that I think my followers would find interesting. 

Models are never really “off duty” anymore, and I view social media as an extension of my career as a whole. Sometimes posting can feel like a chore and in those cases I view it as a necessary part of my work, but other times it’s genuinely fun to share and document my life with friends far and wide. It’s the way of the 21st-century girl.

See our slideshow above featuring our favorite Coco Rocha Instagrams.

FANCY X COCO ROCHA
I’m so excited to announce a very special collaboration with one of my favorite social shopping sites, TheFancy.com. Every month I’ll be pulling together the most Oh-So-Coco items on TheFancy.com into one box which will ship to you anywhere in the world. For $39 you’ll get a Coco Rocha X Fancy Box with $80.00+ worth of products hand-picked by yours truly. The first box ships soon, so subscribe HERE right now! Xx Coco

FANCY X COCO ROCHA

I’m so excited to announce a very special collaboration with one of my favorite social shopping sites, TheFancy.com. Every month I’ll be pulling together the most Oh-So-Coco items on TheFancy.com into one box which will ship to you anywhere in the world. For $39 you’ll get a Coco Rocha X Fancy Box with $80.00+ worth of products hand-picked by yours truly. The first box ships soon, so subscribe HERE right now! Xx Coco


Instagram Tips from Model Coco Rocha - PCMag
By Chandra SteelModel Coco Rocha has over 350,000 followers on Instagram, where she shares behind-the-scenes shots from her modeling gigs, snaps of her global adventures, and even childhood memories on Throwback Thursdays. And she’s got her fair share of experience with what makes a good photo, considering she’s been on billboards and magazine covers the world over. So, how does she do it? Here she shares her tips for those who feel more comfortable behind the camera than in front of it.
1) FIND THE BEST SIDE"If I’m capturing an image of say, the Eiffel Tower, I’m going take at least 10 pictures from varying angles," she says. "Even in today’s world of instant everything, try to take pride in composing an aesthetically beautiful picture."
2) EDIT, EDIT, EDITEver the professional, Rocha doesn’t settle for just Instagram’s filters to make her shots look good. “Before I post my photos to Instagram I nearly always run them through a whole host of photo-editing apps on my iPhone,” she says. “Some of my favorites are Snapseed, Pictwo, Lenslight, and, of course, Camera+.” She notes that what used to be a splurge is now a steal. “It’s astonishing to me that pictures that used to cost tens of thousands of dollars to create in a studio can now be basically created on a phone with a few $1.99 apps,” she says. If you’re planning on sharing, the extra steps are worth it, according to Rocha. “Your audience will thank you for it,” she says. “Treat every upload as if it was a miniature work of art.”
3) DON’T OVERSHAREBut just because creating great photos is nearly free doesn’t mean they should be shared freely. “Your audience is following you for a reason and they clearly do want to hear from you regularly… but not too often,” Rocha advises. “It’s important you don’t overwhelm and overshare because your audience will have no problem clicking ‘unfollow’ if they feel you’re oversaturating their feed.”

Instagram Tips from Model Coco Rocha - PCMag

By Chandra Steel

Model Coco Rocha has over 350,000 followers on Instagram, where she shares behind-the-scenes shots from her modeling gigs, snaps of her global adventures, and even childhood memories on Throwback Thursdays. And she’s got her fair share of experience with what makes a good photo, considering she’s been on billboards and magazine covers the world over. So, how does she do it? Here she shares her tips for those who feel more comfortable behind the camera than in front of it.

1) FIND THE BEST SIDE
"If I’m capturing an image of say, the Eiffel Tower, I’m going take at least 10 pictures from varying angles," she says. "Even in today’s world of instant everything, try to take pride in composing an aesthetically beautiful picture."

2) EDIT, EDIT, EDIT
Ever the professional, Rocha doesn’t settle for just Instagram’s filters to make her shots look good. “Before I post my photos to Instagram I nearly always run them through a whole host of photo-editing apps on my iPhone,” she says. “Some of my favorites are SnapseedPictwoLenslight, and, of course, Camera+.” She notes that what used to be a splurge is now a steal. “It’s astonishing to me that pictures that used to cost tens of thousands of dollars to create in a studio can now be basically created on a phone with a few $1.99 apps,” she says. If you’re planning on sharing, the extra steps are worth it, according to Rocha. “Your audience will thank you for it,” she says. “Treat every upload as if it was a miniature work of art.”

3) DON’T OVERSHARE
But just because creating great photos is nearly free doesn’t mean they should be shared freely. “Your audience is following you for a reason and they clearly do want to hear from you regularly… but not too often,” Rocha advises. “It’s important you don’t overwhelm and overshare because your audience will have no problem clicking ‘unfollow’ if they feel you’re oversaturating their feed.”

PCMag: What Do You Carry, Supermodel Coco Rocha?This week you’ll see the model on the runway at New York Fashion Week and on your TV on “The Face.” But every day, you’ll see her all across social mediaBy Chandra Steel
Model Coco Rocha is renowned in the fashion industry for her posing but when it comes to her professed love of technology, she’s clearly no poser.

Rocha is the undisputed ruler of social media among models. Tumblr, Instagram, Twitter,Facebook, Google+, Weibo, Pose, The Fancy,Viddy, Cinemagram, and, now, Vine—she’s everywhere. She’s also a gadget girl. So it’s fitting that Rocha, the face of many brands and a magazine cover regular, is clearly no stranger to the camera. She even reached out to the forward-thinking camera company Lytro to become better acquainted with its light-field technology camera after reading about it in a blog post. She later served as a judge for the company’s Light Field Photography Contest alongside tech writers and a photographer.
And just a few weeks back, Google invited her to try out Google Glass. “I was like a kid in a candy store!” Rocha told PCMag. “I think this technology will open up a whole array of possibilities to us that we had never dreamed of.”
Rocha knows something about new possibilities. “When I started modeling 10 years ago, there were no models with social media presence, there was no social media as we have it today,” she says. “Now I don’t think a model can expect to survive without it.”Click HERE to read more.

PCMag: What Do You Carry, Supermodel Coco Rocha?

This week you’ll see the model on the runway at New York Fashion Week and on your TV on “The Face.” But every day, you’ll see her all across social media

By Chandra Steel


Model Coco Rocha is renowned in the fashion industry for her posing but when it comes to her professed love of technology, she’s clearly no poser.

Rocha is the undisputed ruler of social media among models. TumblrInstagramTwitter,FacebookGoogle+, Weibo, PoseThe Fancy,Viddy, Cinemagram, and, now, Vine—she’s everywhere. She’s also a gadget girl. So it’s fitting that Rocha, the face of many brands and a magazine cover regular, is clearly no stranger to the camera. She even reached out to the forward-thinking camera company Lytro to become better acquainted with its light-field technology camera after reading about it in a blog post. She later served as a judge for the company’s Light Field Photography Contest alongside tech writers and a photographer.

And just a few weeks back, Google invited her to try out Google Glass. “I was like a kid in a candy store!” Rocha told PCMag. “I think this technology will open up a whole array of possibilities to us that we had never dreamed of.”

Rocha knows something about new possibilities. “When I started modeling 10 years ago, there were no models with social media presence, there was no social media as we have it today,” she says. “Now I don’t think a model can expect to survive without it.”

Click HERE to read more.

GOOGLE+ HANGOUT - The Cast Of The Face.

Did you get a chance yesterday to tune into the live Google+ hangout with me, Naomi, Karolina and Nigel? If not, we have you covered with the whole interview. I seriously think we should do a recap show like this every week, who’s with me?! 

If you haven’t checked out Google+, you really should. This feature is amazing.

Xx
Coco

Sass & Bide - TAKEOVER

If you know me, you know I love my social media. Turns out my favorite Aussie brand Sass & Bide must have noticed because they’ve asked me to take over their online digital empire for the entire week! Starting tomorrow morning I’ll be running Sass & Bide’s five online channels: Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Pinterest and, of course, Tumblr. They’ve asked me to go nuts posting my own self-styled images featuring pieces from their most recent collection. You can view the campaign so far and enter the competition to win a look from Sass & Bide at The Take Over!

Xx
Coco

P.S Speaking of social media, have you checked out VINE yet? If not, you’re missing out!

DUJOUR MAGAZINE - COCO ROCHA: MODEL CITIZEN

With her strong beliefs and her social-media savvy, Rocha—on Oxygen’s The Face—is a standout in her field

By Lindsay Silberman

The first thing that strikes you about Coco Rocha is, of course, her face. It has those perfect angles, the sharp, sculpted ones that seem to be a prerequisite for becoming a model. But before you can even process the rest of her otherworldly appearance—her flawless ivory complexion, her piercing blue eyes, her slim yet towering frame—you sense there’s a certain depth to her, something a bit more complex.

We’ve arranged to chat over lunch at a casual cafe-bakery in Manhattan’s Flatiron District. She arrives early, having taken the train in from New York’s Westchester County. “I honestly don’t mind it,” she says about taking public transportation. “People do it in any other city. It feels normal.” (She and her husband, muralist James Conran, moved there a year ago.)

As she enters the cafe, the 24-year-old doesn’t walk so much as float—a skill she picked up from her years on the runway. And if the people sitting at the tables near us don’t immediately recognize her, they probably whispered over their turkey sandwiches, “She has to be a model.” Today, the massive fur coat, black pants and stilettos she’s wearing are a dead giveaway.

Her first request is surprising: With autumn in the air, she’s in the mood for pumpkin pie today, so would it be OK if she had a slice for lunch? The Canadian-born model has recently wrapped production for Oxygen’s The Face, a new reality show (premiering February 12 at 9PM ET/PT) in which young women compete to become the face of Ulta Beauty. The show bills itself as giving a more realistic depiction of the challenges and demands of modeling than America’s Next Top Model—a series notorious for its jumping-out-of-planes and posing-with-snakes theatrics. Rocha serves as a mentor and coach for a team of four fledgling models, who compete against squads led by supermodels Naomi Campbell and Karolina Kurkova. Every week, each team competes to win an actual job.

It’s an opportunity the thoughtful, soft-spoken Rocha describes as “surreal,” and understandably so. Her career—gracing the cover of Vogue, walking the runways at the Paris, Milan and New York fashion shows, appearing in ad campaigns for Chanel and YSL—is unusual for someone like her. Rocha is a devout Jehovah’s Witness, as is her husband. “My faith is everything,” she declares. Raised by her mother, Rocha has been a Jehovah’s Witness her entire life, but she wasn’t baptized until 2009—the religion requires that individuals be old enough to make their own decisions before committing.

Read More