LIFE via INSTAGRAM (Part Two) - March 4th to 15th

If you couldn’t already tell, I love a good selfie. Hopefully you like selfies too, because I’m about to show you nine of them. Thank you NYC for providing some cool backdrops. xx

  1. I’m very excited to announce my girls at Senhoa are launching their new Solidarity Collection on International Women’s Day (March 8th). All Senhoa jewelry is handmade by women and survivors of human trafficking and I am so proud to serve on their advisory board! 
  2. New cover alert! Harpers Bazaar Australia - stay tuned for the editorial. Xx
  3. Trying to nap on the floor of this set was not very comfy ‘til I #PutABagOnIt. Thanks Dannijo!! 👌👜😴
  4. #FlashbackFriday James and I getting ready for the McQueen Met Gala a few years ago. Always my favorite event with my favorite date.
  5. I’m gigantic! It’s all about the angle. #modeling101
  6. Tip of the hat to ya!
  7. Dare I say that spring has sprung in NYC today!?
  8. Day & night. Please check my last post - it’s been a long day.
  9. Hanging out with the boys on Greene Street. #DarthPunk #DaftVader #StarWarsChic #StormTrooperCouture
Moving Images and Images That Move UsBy Coco Rocha for PCMag
The rise of the internet has spouted a deluge of images. Has it rendered the visual nearly meaningless? If so, how can skilled creators use tech to turn that around?
There was a time when seeing a picture was a rare privilege. In the days before photography and the modern printing process you’d be lucky to have your own artwork at home and, if you did, family, neighbors, and guests would probably gather around it for hours on end. Though the printing press made images available on a mass level in the 15th century, they were still not cheap or easy to come by for most. By the late 18th century magazines started to find their place in households around the world and by the middle of the 20th century advertisers using images as a means for communication had reached their golden age. There was no casually thumbing through the few magazines you had access to each month. Each picture would be dutifully inspected and a great image would be remembered for life.
For a hundred years that was the way of the world until the information age when the Internet spouted at first a steady trickle and then a deluge of images. Today the average person surfing the Internet and sites like Tumblr or Instagram may see hundreds if not thousands of new pictures and images a day. Whether they’re good, bad, or ugly, images go in and out of our consciousness without leaving much - if any - impression.This change in attitude toward the image is devastating to publishers and advertisers who face an exponential increase in competition and a decrease in attention. As a model I feel it as much as anyone in the business; my role in fashion and advertising is to draw the viewer in, make him or her stop and consider: are we holding your attention? For my peers and I the answer is probably “Yes, but not for long enough,” and for that reason I think static images as advertising have to change.
The futures of both advertising and fashion editorials have to lie with far more interactive images…
READ MORE AT PCMAG (click)
(photo by Jamie Beck for Senhoa)

Moving Images and Images That Move Us
By Coco Rocha for PCMag

The rise of the internet has spouted a deluge of images. Has it rendered the visual nearly meaningless? If so, how can skilled creators use tech to turn that around?

There was a time when seeing a picture was a rare privilege. In the days before photography and the modern printing process you’d be lucky to have your own artwork at home and, if you did, family, neighbors, and guests would probably gather around it for hours on end. Though the printing press made images available on a mass level in the 15th century, they were still not cheap or easy to come by for most. By the late 18th century magazines started to find their place in households around the world and by the middle of the 20th century advertisers using images as a means for communication had reached their golden age. There was no casually thumbing through the few magazines you had access to each month. Each picture would be dutifully inspected and a great image would be remembered for life.

For a hundred years that was the way of the world until the information age when the Internet spouted at first a steady trickle and then a deluge of images. Today the average person surfing the Internet and sites like Tumblr or Instagram may see hundreds if not thousands of new pictures and images a day. Whether they’re good, bad, or ugly, images go in and out of our consciousness without leaving much - if any - impression.

This change in attitude toward the image is devastating to publishers and advertisers who face an exponential increase in competition and a decrease in attention. As a model I feel it as much as anyone in the business; my role in fashion and advertising is to draw the viewer in, make him or her stop and consider: are we holding your attention? For my peers and I the answer is probably “Yes, but not for long enough,” and for that reason I think static images as advertising have to change.

The futures of both advertising and fashion editorials have to lie with far more interactive images…

READ MORE AT PCMAG (click)

(photo by Jamie Beck for Senhoa)

Oceana Magazine - Super Role Model

One of the unexpected responsibilities that goes along with being a model or public figure is that your actions can and will affect lots of younger people who may look up to you. It’s something I’ve tried to take seriously over the years because I feel there is a severe lack of good role models in the media for young people to emulate.

The above editorial and interview go along with the Oceana covers I posted earlier this week. The magazine’s primary focus is on the juxtaposition of fashion, charity and leadership, so I was happy to talk a lot about my favorite charities and why I support them. Senhoa is a group in Cambodia that rescues little girls from human trafficking and gives them a home, an education and a job. I designed a special jewelry line for Senhoa and asked my friends Behati Prinsloo, Caroline Trentini and Iman to model it and my fellow The Face castmate Nigel Barker to photograph it. 

LakayPam is a group in Haiti that supports and nurtures hundreds of orphans, many of whom were affected by the earthquake. In addition to fundraising events, my husband James, Behati and I traveled down to Haiti to create a documentary (click HERE to watch) and raise awareness for the ongoing difficulties in that country.  

The Model Alliance is a New York-based group which is fighting for fair and safe working standards for younger models. Though we are a new group, we have already seen lots of industry support and incremental change for the better.

If you’re interested, please read more in the articles posted above or click the tags to the right!

Xx
Coco 

NYFW via my iPhone - Day One

  1. My outfit on the first day of New York Fashion Week: Jacket by Rebecca Minkoff, pants by Helmut Lang, jewelry by Coco Rocha for Senhoa!
  2. So proud to see “Coco Rocha For Senhoa Jewlery" exclusively at THE GREEN SHOWS in Lincoln Center. A fashion event committed to eco-friendly, ethically sound, fair-trade fashion during NYFW.
  3. The gorgeous Candice Swanepoel in one of my favorite looks at Jason Wu.
  4. Backstage at Rebecca Minkoff with the beautiful and iconic Beverly Johnson.
  5. My absolute favorite look from Rebecca Minkoff.
  6. Signing autographs for the loyal fashion fans outside the tents at NYFW.
  7. Change of clothes for Helmut Lang.
  8. Bumped into fellow Marilyn Paris model Ashley Smith at Helmut. I need a beret in my life, too!
  9. One of my favorite looks from Helmut Lang. Lots of sinister red, black and gray tie-dye, leather and furs. Just my style.

Coco Rocha for Senhoa
Images by Jamie Beck and Kevin Burg
.

As a model I’m asked to sell all kinds of products. Sometimes it’s shoes, gowns, lipsticks… sometimes it’s even Coca Cola. The launch of the Coco Rocha for Senhoa jewelry line marks the first time I’ve ever tried to sell a product that was entirely of my own creation. But more than that, this is a very special venture for me. I first found out about Senhoa at my wedding in France last summer. Lisa, the founder, gifted me a beautiful Senhoa bracelet which I wore the first day of my wedding. She told me the story behind the jewelry and Senhoa. Between the ages of 4 and 19, these girls are rescued from brothels and human trafficking in Cambodia. Many of the girls do not have a family to return to as it was their families who actually sold them into slavery in the first place. The girls receive a full education and rehabilitation in the Senhoa program and are offered a job in jewelry-making when they turn 15. This job pays them even more than school teachers make. In just 2 years Senhoa now has over 50 girls in the program.

After meeting Lisa I tried to wear Senhoa pieces at events and on the red carpet, mentioning them whenever I could. Earlier this year we decided that a jewelry collaboration was probably the best way I could lend my voice to the cause and so I poured myself into the process of sketching and designing the jewelry. I knew I wanted to create bold statement pieces that were both powerful and beautiful as I felt that this would aptly symbolize the Senhoa girl who is being empowered by the Senhoa program.  I flew out to L.A. to actually put the jewelry together myself and I’m glad I did -  I got to experience firsthand the intricate and painstaking work the girls put into this jewelry (I spent a whole day beading just one piece!). We used high quality materials like Swarovski crystals in the jewelry, which not only add to the beauty of the product, but also help instill the feeling of self-worth in these girls who are now working with and associating themselves with materials of high value. I think one of the great things about this jewelry line is that every hand that worked on it,  from design to production, is deeply invested in its success. Hopefully you’ll feel the love when you wear the pieces.

Our slogan with the Coco Rocha for Senhoa line is “accessorize your conscience” because, unlike many of the purchases you might make for yourself, you don’t need to feel guilty about this one. Once the older girls are paid for their time as jewelry makers, all the profit goes to fund the food, medicine, shelter and education of the younger ones. It’s a cycle of girls helping girls and I’m so proud to be a part of it all.

This Friday I can think of few purchases as worthwhile as a piece from this jewelry line, for you or your loved one. Please go to www.senhoa.com/cocorocha to find out more.

xx Coco Rocha

Chuyện Hoa Sen - In Full Bloom
Narrated by Coco Rocha

Just three weeks ago we launched the Coco Rocha for Senhoa jewelry collection to an amazing outpouring of support from people all around the world. Not only are people enjoying the design and quality of the pieces, but they are truly moved by the stories of the girls who put these beautiful pieces together.

I encourage you take a few minutes to watch this documentary I narrated to better understand why this jewelry line is so important to so many.

To see the entire Coco Rocha for Senhoa collection go HERE.

Senhoa.org created a great press blog devoted entirely to the Coco Rocha for Senhoa jewelry line launch. Click below to explore all the amazing reviews and press we have been getting around the world! xx CR

cocorochaforsenhoa:

Coco Rocha attends the 15th Annual ACE Awards
November 8th, 2011

The ACE Awards was created in 1996 to pay homage to those individuals and groups that have made great strides in raising the awareness of the accessories industry.  Along with her gorgeous Zac Posen gown, Coco Rocha wore her own unique accessories in the form of a necklace and bracelet (Chantha & Chantrea) from The Coco Rocha for Senhoa Collection - Comprised of 7 unique looks, the Coco Rocha capsule collection benefits survivors of human trafficking in Cambodia.

For more information go to www.senhoa.com/cocorocha

UK TELEGRAPH - November 1st, 2011
by Aurelia Donaldson

Canadian supermodel Coco Rocha talks to the Telegraph about her latest humanitarian project - a range of jewellery to benefit Cambodian exploitation survivors.


While most models are commonly known for lending their face for the top fashion campaigns, storming the catwalks and attending fabulous fashion parties, Coco Rocha is also becoming increasingly known for her humanitarian efforts. The Canadian-born supermodel recently released a short film called ‘Letter to Haiti’ which documented her trip to Haiti shortly after the earthquake destroyed the area. The film, directed by her husband James Conran, follows Rocha as she hands out thousands of letters from people around the world to the children of Haiti.

Her latest philanthropic work benefits the victims of human trafficking and exploitation in Cambodia. Alongside Senhoa, a jewellery company that supports victims of human trafficking by providing income-generating opportunities, Rocha has designed seven jewellery pieces which will be handcrafted by the Cambodian survivors, often children aged 15 and up. Using Swarovski crystals the pieces will be sold on www.senhoa.com/cocorocha , with all proceeds going to Senhoa’s community development projects that rehabilitate and educate the young women of Cambodia.

Rocha has also made sure her fashion friends are involved and enlisted models Iman and Caroline Trentini to join her in the campaign shot by America’s Next Top Model judge and photographer Nigel Barker.
Rocha became involved with Senoa after the founder of the site, Lisa T.D. Nguyen, attended her wedding to James Conran in June 2010, during which Rocha wore a dress designed by close friend Zac Posen.
The jewellery is available to buy from today on Senoa’s website, where you can also see the campaign and read more about the collection.

With special thanks to Coco Rocha, James Conran, Calvin at Storm Models and Micki Schneider at Wilhelmina Models.

www.cocorocha.com
www.senhoa.com/cocorocha
www.stormmodels.com
www.wilhelmina.com

ANTM - Behind-the-scenes photos.

Can you believe a whole week has passed since my guest episode of America’s Next Top Model!? Yep, tonight is the new episode! I just wanted to share some behind-the-scenes pictures from last week with you (to see even more go HERE). GJ stands for “Guest Judge” by the way, in case you were wondering.

Some of you were asking to see a better image of what I was wearing to the judges panel - it’s a 1970s romper I found at a vintage store in Michigan for like $25! Do you love it or hate it? My earrings were made by a group called SENHOA, and I’m very happy to tell you we are working on a collaboration line together that is coming out VERY VERY soon.

Its name will be "Coco Rocha for Senhoa." Stay tuned…