Longchamp F/W 12 - The Mystery Of Emily’s LegsI enjoy a good Photoshop fail as much as the next person, but when I saw blogs today (Huffington Post, I’m looking at you) supposedly pointing out a “photoshop disaster” in my current Longchamp campaign, I knew I had to correct them. According to HuffPost, Emily's feet MUST have been photoshopped out. They even gave us a cheeky explanation of exactly how pedalling works. Accctually, as you can see in the behind-the-scenes pictures above (which were posted everywhere a few months back), she’s just balancing with her feet on the seat behind me. Skillful, I know, but no Photoshop disaster this time.
Dear Huffington Post, this is how we roll.  I believe you stand corrected! ;)XxCocoP.S I still stand behind THIS STATEMENT. 

Longchamp F/W 12 - The Mystery Of Emily’s Legs

I enjoy a good Photoshop fail as much as the next person, but when I saw blogs today (Huffington Post, I’m looking at you) supposedly pointing out a “photoshop disaster” in my current Longchamp campaign, I knew I had to correct them. According to HuffPost, Emily's feet MUST have been photoshopped out. They even gave us a cheeky explanation of exactly how pedalling works. Accctually, as you can see in the behind-the-scenes pictures above (which were posted everywhere a few months back), she’s just balancing with her feet on the seat behind me. Skillful, I know, but no Photoshop disaster this time.


Dear Huffington Post, this is how we roll.  I believe you stand corrected! ;)

Xx
Coco

P.S I still stand behind THIS STATEMENT

JACOB - Sans photoshop.A few months ago I announced the partnership between Jacob and myself on their fall 2011 campaign with a new “no retouching” policy - I’m happy to show you the first image from that campaign! Does this mean I’m now anti-photoshop? Absolutely not. I know what a valuable artist’s tool it can be in the right hands. What I really admire is the fact that Jacob is trying to balance the scales a little by pulling so far back from what has been the current trend of total digital model manipulation. I don’t expect that all brands will jump on board and cut out photoshop use, neither do I think that it’s necessary - but I do hope that this campaign might help some in our industry stop and think about what the public really wants to see before they shrink another model down to an impossible size. Bold move? Lasting trend? We will have to see.

JACOB - Sans photoshop.

A few months ago I announced the partnership between Jacob and myself on their fall 2011 campaign with a new “no retouching” policy - I’m happy to show you the first image from that campaign!

Does this mean I’m now anti-photoshop? Absolutely not. I know what a valuable artist’s tool it can be in the right hands. What I really admire is the fact that Jacob is trying to balance the scales a little by pulling so far back from what has been the current trend of total digital model manipulation. I don’t expect that all brands will jump on board and cut out photoshop use, neither do I think that it’s necessary - but I do hope that this campaign might help some in our industry stop and think about what the public really wants to see before they shrink another model down to an impossible size. Bold move? Lasting trend? We will have to see.

LOU LOU - Three weeks ago I announced my partnership with Jacob on a completely Photoshop free campaign for the Canadian brand. Lou Lou magazine met up with me at the Old Port in Montreal to watch the shoot take place and to ask me a few questions about the campaign, Haiti and my nerdy use of social media. Have a look…

NO PHOTOSHOP - Photoshop use amongst professionals ranges from mild blemish removal to the complete rebuilding of human anatomy. We’ve seen it used well and we have certainly seen it used badly (for example, on 99% of all DVD covers). I’m excited to be able to announce that Jacob, the Canadian fashion brand, has asked me to be the face of their fall 2011 campaign with their new “no retouching policy.”Bold move? Lasting trend?  Stay tuned for the results.

NO PHOTOSHOP - Photoshop use amongst professionals ranges from mild blemish removal to the complete rebuilding of human anatomy. We’ve seen it used well and we have certainly seen it used badly (for example, on 99% of all DVD covers). I’m excited to be able to announce that Jacob, the Canadian fashion brand, has asked me to be the face of their fall 2011 campaign with their new “no retouching policy.”

Bold move? Lasting trend?  Stay tuned for the results.