VIDEO: Fashion 2.0 Awards Marry Style, Social Media

Technology awards shows are not known for their style, but the Fashion 2.0 Awards are different. The Style Coalition-backed event honors social-media stars and startups in the fashion space.

Robert Verdi, former host of Fashion Police, MC’d the evening and designer Zac Posen was keynote speaker. “We are at the frontier of a new universe where we’re able to communicate and be voyeurs,” Posen said. “It’s up to all of us in the fashion arena to be responsible for how we create the voice and language and how we work in this new universe.”

PCMag’s Coco Rocha presented the Innovator Award and spoke of her social media presence, which spans 13 million followers across her Twitter, Instagram, Facebook, and other accounts. “Social media has certainly changed my career and for that matter every aspect and job within the fashion industry,” Rocha said. “The brands and people in fashion who are thriving today are the ones who are boldly embracing the new and pushing the boundaries of art and commerce in this digital world. This is the essence of Fashion 2.0.”

The two techiest awards of the night were Best Wearable Tech and Best Fashion Startup. The Nike+ FuelBand ran away with the first, beating even the far more fashion-forward Cuff line of smartphone-enabled jewelry. Best Fashion Startup went to Acustom Apparel, a SoHo-based retailer that creates custom clothing for customers after 3D scanning them. The Fashion 2.0 Awards have been prescient in the past. The first year of their existence, Dennis Crowley accepted the Next Big Thing in Social Media Award for Foursquare.

PCMag’s Coco Rocha Explores CE Week’s Wearable Tech - The tech-savvy supermodel gets her hands on enhanced glasses, dresses, and clutches.

By Chandra Steele

The mini mid-year preview of CES that is CE Week landed in New York City last week, and PCMag made the crosstown pilgrimage with one of our newest columnists, Coco Rocha. On display were Wi-Fi-enabled cars, Made in NY startups, the biggest of big-screen TVs, and, of course, wearable tech.

Rocha wrote about Google Glass and other wearable tech in her column this month, and got hands-on with some at the show. Google invited her to try out Google Glass back in January, but at CE Week Rocha tried on an entirely different type of wearable glasses-based technology, PSiO. It combines sound and light therapy for a sensory experience designed to relax and reenergize the wearer.

Rocha also donned a cap outfitted with Cynaps, a Bluetooth-enabled, bone-conduction alternative to earphones. Once an Indiegogo project and now a shipping product, the system lets you listen to music and take calls without headphones interfering with sounds from your surrounding environment.

READ MORE HERE

Google Glass: Getting In Your Face - Is Google Glass the future of wearable tech?
By Coco Rocha for PCMag
At the beginning of this year, Google asked me if I’d like to try out a prototype of Google Glass. Being a complete gadget junkie, I’d read all about them and was as excited as anyone to actually put them on. A future of augmented reality in the form of computer glasses has long been the dream of many a science fiction fan who imagines a world where information is superimposed into his vision, where his every move is documented and archived and thus no memory is ever lost and every experience can be relived. (That may also be a dream function for the NSA.)
Given time, Google Glass definitely has the potential to give us that fully augmented reality that so many have been asking for. But in answering that desire, it’s also brought up some new questions: will we still want it when we have it? Will it overwhelm and shorten our already-minute attention span? Will it make life chaotic or simplify it? And will its intrusion into our perceived privacy and personal space be a cultural issue? The debate has just begun, but so has the technology. From my hour or so with the prototype of Google Glass I got the feeling that it was sort of like the Wright brothers’ flying machine—that we still have a way to go before we get to something more like a Lear jet.
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As obvious as this may sound, I felt keenly self-conscious that I was wearing a small computer strapped to my head. To be straightforward, I think the main problem with most examples of “wearable tech” is that the emphasis is overwhelmingly put on the tech rather than it being truly wearable. To widen their appeal for when Google Glass becomes commercially available, Google would do well to mind its approach to design so that we don’t risk looking like Geordi from Star Trek or a Terminator. It would be smart to partner with established eyewear designers such as Tom Ford or Ray-Ban to create something truly aesthetically pleasing that people would want to wear. Such collaborations could ensure that wearable tech is actually wearable. If not, I feel that Google Glass could quickly go the way of the Bluetooth headset—something that only obnoxious bro-types wear on their heads in 2015.
With Google Glass, I felt the most uncomfortable when I had to announce commands verbally. This is also my problem with Siri and other voice-activated technology; who wants to be the crazy person speaking to a computer? At the time I suggested to the reps from Google that maybe they could have Glass read some kind of rudimentary sign language. Perhaps you could wear a ring or bracelet with a small accelerometer embedded that reads your movements and reports it to Glass. Yep, in my mind’s eye I was sorting through files like Tom Cruise in Minority Report. Then again, maybe looking like you’re conducting an invisible orchestra is just as crazy as speaking to an invisible computer assistant.
By the sound if it, Google Glass will have immediate competition in the wearable tech space from Apple and Samsung when it hits the wider market in a few months. As you’re undoubtedly aware, Apple has reportedly been testing 1.5-inch curved OLED screens that would be perfect for an “iWatch." It’s even started trademarking the name in many countries. And this spring, Samsung confirmed development of a smartwatch. From the rumors alone it sounds like the smartwatch concept could be a much more comfortable and acceptable apparatus to use, even if its form means it can’t offer the same level of interactivity.
The era of wearable tech that Google Glass and smartwatches are moving us into will be something like the smartphone market seven years ago; we will see wildly different takes on the idea that will filter down into a few tried and tested models that make sense for most people. The one rule I see dominating this emerging industry is that for wearable tech to really make sense it has to enhance our life, not complicate it or intrude upon it.

Google Glass: Getting In Your Face - Is Google Glass the future of wearable tech?

By Coco Rocha for PCMag

At the beginning of this year, Google asked me if I’d like to try out a prototype of Google Glass. Being a complete gadget junkie, I’d read all about them and was as excited as anyone to actually put them on. A future of augmented reality in the form of computer glasses has long been the dream of many a science fiction fan who imagines a world where information is superimposed into his vision, where his every move is documented and archived and thus no memory is ever lost and every experience can be relived. (That may also be a dream function for the NSA.)

Given time, Google Glass definitely has the potential to give us that fully augmented reality that so many have been asking for. But in answering that desire, it’s also brought up some new questions: will we still want it when we have it? Will it overwhelm and shorten our already-minute attention span? Will it make life chaotic or simplify it? And will its intrusion into our perceived privacy and personal space be a cultural issue? The debate has just begun, but so has the technology. From my hour or so with the prototype of Google Glass I got the feeling that it was sort of like the Wright brothers’ flying machine—that we still have a way to go before we get to something more like a Lear jet.

Read More

Moving Images and Images That Move Us
By Coco Rocha for PCMag

The rise of the internet has spouted a deluge of images. Has it rendered the visual nearly meaningless? If so, how can skilled creators use tech to turn that around?

There was a time when seeing a picture was a rare privilege. In the days before photography and the modern printing process you’d be lucky to have your own artwork at home and, if you did, family, neighbors, and guests would probably gather around it for hours on end. Though the printing press made images available on a mass level in the 15th century, they were still not cheap or easy to come by for most. By the late 18th century magazines started to find their place in households around the world and by the middle of the 20th century advertisers using images as a means for communication had reached their golden age. There was no casually thumbing through the few magazines you had access to each month. Each picture would be dutifully inspected and a great image would be remembered for life.

For a hundred years that was the way of the world until the information age when the Internet spouted at first a steady trickle and then a deluge of images. Today the average person surfing the Internet and sites like Tumblr or Instagram may see hundreds if not thousands of new pictures and images a day. Whether they’re good, bad, or ugly, images go in and out of our consciousness without leaving much - if any - impression.

This change in attitude toward the image is devastating to publishers and advertisers who face an exponential increase in competition and a decrease in attention. As a model I feel it as much as anyone in the business; my role in fashion and advertising is to draw the viewer in, make him or her stop and consider: are we holding your attention? For my peers and I the answer is probably “Yes, but not for long enough,” and for that reason I think static images as advertising have to change.

The futures of both advertising and fashion editorials have to lie with far more interactive images…

READ MORE AT PCMAG (click)

(Photos by Eric Cheng for Lytro - Art direction by James Conran. Styling by Rebecca Conran)

Moving Images and Images That Move UsBy Coco Rocha for PCMag
The rise of the internet has spouted a deluge of images. Has it rendered the visual nearly meaningless? If so, how can skilled creators use tech to turn that around?
There was a time when seeing a picture was a rare privilege. In the days before photography and the modern printing process you’d be lucky to have your own artwork at home and, if you did, family, neighbors, and guests would probably gather around it for hours on end. Though the printing press made images available on a mass level in the 15th century, they were still not cheap or easy to come by for most. By the late 18th century magazines started to find their place in households around the world and by the middle of the 20th century advertisers using images as a means for communication had reached their golden age. There was no casually thumbing through the few magazines you had access to each month. Each picture would be dutifully inspected and a great image would be remembered for life.
For a hundred years that was the way of the world until the information age when the Internet spouted at first a steady trickle and then a deluge of images. Today the average person surfing the Internet and sites like Tumblr or Instagram may see hundreds if not thousands of new pictures and images a day. Whether they’re good, bad, or ugly, images go in and out of our consciousness without leaving much - if any - impression.This change in attitude toward the image is devastating to publishers and advertisers who face an exponential increase in competition and a decrease in attention. As a model I feel it as much as anyone in the business; my role in fashion and advertising is to draw the viewer in, make him or her stop and consider: are we holding your attention? For my peers and I the answer is probably “Yes, but not for long enough,” and for that reason I think static images as advertising have to change.
The futures of both advertising and fashion editorials have to lie with far more interactive images…
READ MORE AT PCMAG (click)
(photo by Jamie Beck for Senhoa)

Moving Images and Images That Move Us
By Coco Rocha for PCMag

The rise of the internet has spouted a deluge of images. Has it rendered the visual nearly meaningless? If so, how can skilled creators use tech to turn that around?

There was a time when seeing a picture was a rare privilege. In the days before photography and the modern printing process you’d be lucky to have your own artwork at home and, if you did, family, neighbors, and guests would probably gather around it for hours on end. Though the printing press made images available on a mass level in the 15th century, they were still not cheap or easy to come by for most. By the late 18th century magazines started to find their place in households around the world and by the middle of the 20th century advertisers using images as a means for communication had reached their golden age. There was no casually thumbing through the few magazines you had access to each month. Each picture would be dutifully inspected and a great image would be remembered for life.

For a hundred years that was the way of the world until the information age when the Internet spouted at first a steady trickle and then a deluge of images. Today the average person surfing the Internet and sites like Tumblr or Instagram may see hundreds if not thousands of new pictures and images a day. Whether they’re good, bad, or ugly, images go in and out of our consciousness without leaving much - if any - impression.

This change in attitude toward the image is devastating to publishers and advertisers who face an exponential increase in competition and a decrease in attention. As a model I feel it as much as anyone in the business; my role in fashion and advertising is to draw the viewer in, make him or her stop and consider: are we holding your attention? For my peers and I the answer is probably “Yes, but not for long enough,” and for that reason I think static images as advertising have to change.

The futures of both advertising and fashion editorials have to lie with far more interactive images…

READ MORE AT PCMAG (click)

(photo by Jamie Beck for Senhoa)


Instagram Tips from Model Coco Rocha - PCMag
By Chandra SteelModel Coco Rocha has over 350,000 followers on Instagram, where she shares behind-the-scenes shots from her modeling gigs, snaps of her global adventures, and even childhood memories on Throwback Thursdays. And she’s got her fair share of experience with what makes a good photo, considering she’s been on billboards and magazine covers the world over. So, how does she do it? Here she shares her tips for those who feel more comfortable behind the camera than in front of it.
1) FIND THE BEST SIDE"If I’m capturing an image of say, the Eiffel Tower, I’m going take at least 10 pictures from varying angles," she says. "Even in today’s world of instant everything, try to take pride in composing an aesthetically beautiful picture."
2) EDIT, EDIT, EDITEver the professional, Rocha doesn’t settle for just Instagram’s filters to make her shots look good. “Before I post my photos to Instagram I nearly always run them through a whole host of photo-editing apps on my iPhone,” she says. “Some of my favorites are Snapseed, Pictwo, Lenslight, and, of course, Camera+.” She notes that what used to be a splurge is now a steal. “It’s astonishing to me that pictures that used to cost tens of thousands of dollars to create in a studio can now be basically created on a phone with a few $1.99 apps,” she says. If you’re planning on sharing, the extra steps are worth it, according to Rocha. “Your audience will thank you for it,” she says. “Treat every upload as if it was a miniature work of art.”
3) DON’T OVERSHAREBut just because creating great photos is nearly free doesn’t mean they should be shared freely. “Your audience is following you for a reason and they clearly do want to hear from you regularly… but not too often,” Rocha advises. “It’s important you don’t overwhelm and overshare because your audience will have no problem clicking ‘unfollow’ if they feel you’re oversaturating their feed.”

Instagram Tips from Model Coco Rocha - PCMag

By Chandra Steel

Model Coco Rocha has over 350,000 followers on Instagram, where she shares behind-the-scenes shots from her modeling gigs, snaps of her global adventures, and even childhood memories on Throwback Thursdays. And she’s got her fair share of experience with what makes a good photo, considering she’s been on billboards and magazine covers the world over. So, how does she do it? Here she shares her tips for those who feel more comfortable behind the camera than in front of it.

1) FIND THE BEST SIDE
"If I’m capturing an image of say, the Eiffel Tower, I’m going take at least 10 pictures from varying angles," she says. "Even in today’s world of instant everything, try to take pride in composing an aesthetically beautiful picture."

2) EDIT, EDIT, EDIT
Ever the professional, Rocha doesn’t settle for just Instagram’s filters to make her shots look good. “Before I post my photos to Instagram I nearly always run them through a whole host of photo-editing apps on my iPhone,” she says. “Some of my favorites are SnapseedPictwoLenslight, and, of course, Camera+.” She notes that what used to be a splurge is now a steal. “It’s astonishing to me that pictures that used to cost tens of thousands of dollars to create in a studio can now be basically created on a phone with a few $1.99 apps,” she says. If you’re planning on sharing, the extra steps are worth it, according to Rocha. “Your audience will thank you for it,” she says. “Treat every upload as if it was a miniature work of art.”

3) DON’T OVERSHARE
But just because creating great photos is nearly free doesn’t mean they should be shared freely. “Your audience is following you for a reason and they clearly do want to hear from you regularly… but not too often,” Rocha advises. “It’s important you don’t overwhelm and overshare because your audience will have no problem clicking ‘unfollow’ if they feel you’re oversaturating their feed.”

PCMag: What Do You Carry, Supermodel Coco Rocha?This week you’ll see the model on the runway at New York Fashion Week and on your TV on “The Face.” But every day, you’ll see her all across social mediaBy Chandra Steel
Model Coco Rocha is renowned in the fashion industry for her posing but when it comes to her professed love of technology, she’s clearly no poser.

Rocha is the undisputed ruler of social media among models. Tumblr, Instagram, Twitter,Facebook, Google+, Weibo, Pose, The Fancy,Viddy, Cinemagram, and, now, Vine—she’s everywhere. She’s also a gadget girl. So it’s fitting that Rocha, the face of many brands and a magazine cover regular, is clearly no stranger to the camera. She even reached out to the forward-thinking camera company Lytro to become better acquainted with its light-field technology camera after reading about it in a blog post. She later served as a judge for the company’s Light Field Photography Contest alongside tech writers and a photographer.
And just a few weeks back, Google invited her to try out Google Glass. “I was like a kid in a candy store!” Rocha told PCMag. “I think this technology will open up a whole array of possibilities to us that we had never dreamed of.”
Rocha knows something about new possibilities. “When I started modeling 10 years ago, there were no models with social media presence, there was no social media as we have it today,” she says. “Now I don’t think a model can expect to survive without it.”Click HERE to read more.

PCMag: What Do You Carry, Supermodel Coco Rocha?

This week you’ll see the model on the runway at New York Fashion Week and on your TV on “The Face.” But every day, you’ll see her all across social media

By Chandra Steel


Model Coco Rocha is renowned in the fashion industry for her posing but when it comes to her professed love of technology, she’s clearly no poser.

Rocha is the undisputed ruler of social media among models. TumblrInstagramTwitter,FacebookGoogle+, Weibo, PoseThe Fancy,Viddy, Cinemagram, and, now, Vine—she’s everywhere. She’s also a gadget girl. So it’s fitting that Rocha, the face of many brands and a magazine cover regular, is clearly no stranger to the camera. She even reached out to the forward-thinking camera company Lytro to become better acquainted with its light-field technology camera after reading about it in a blog post. She later served as a judge for the company’s Light Field Photography Contest alongside tech writers and a photographer.

And just a few weeks back, Google invited her to try out Google Glass. “I was like a kid in a candy store!” Rocha told PCMag. “I think this technology will open up a whole array of possibilities to us that we had never dreamed of.”

Rocha knows something about new possibilities. “When I started modeling 10 years ago, there were no models with social media presence, there was no social media as we have it today,” she says. “Now I don’t think a model can expect to survive without it.”

Click HERE to read more.