Moving Images and Images That Move Us
By Coco Rocha for PCMag

The rise of the internet has spouted a deluge of images. Has it rendered the visual nearly meaningless? If so, how can skilled creators use tech to turn that around?

There was a time when seeing a picture was a rare privilege. In the days before photography and the modern printing process you’d be lucky to have your own artwork at home and, if you did, family, neighbors, and guests would probably gather around it for hours on end. Though the printing press made images available on a mass level in the 15th century, they were still not cheap or easy to come by for most. By the late 18th century magazines started to find their place in households around the world and by the middle of the 20th century advertisers using images as a means for communication had reached their golden age. There was no casually thumbing through the few magazines you had access to each month. Each picture would be dutifully inspected and a great image would be remembered for life.

For a hundred years that was the way of the world until the information age when the Internet spouted at first a steady trickle and then a deluge of images. Today the average person surfing the Internet and sites like Tumblr or Instagram may see hundreds if not thousands of new pictures and images a day. Whether they’re good, bad, or ugly, images go in and out of our consciousness without leaving much - if any - impression.

This change in attitude toward the image is devastating to publishers and advertisers who face an exponential increase in competition and a decrease in attention. As a model I feel it as much as anyone in the business; my role in fashion and advertising is to draw the viewer in, make him or her stop and consider: are we holding your attention? For my peers and I the answer is probably “Yes, but not for long enough,” and for that reason I think static images as advertising have to change.

The futures of both advertising and fashion editorials have to lie with far more interactive images…

READ MORE AT PCMAG (click)

(Photos by Eric Cheng for Lytro - Art direction by James Conran. Styling by Rebecca Conran)

PCMag: What Do You Carry, Supermodel Coco Rocha?This week you’ll see the model on the runway at New York Fashion Week and on your TV on “The Face.” But every day, you’ll see her all across social mediaBy Chandra Steel
Model Coco Rocha is renowned in the fashion industry for her posing but when it comes to her professed love of technology, she’s clearly no poser.

Rocha is the undisputed ruler of social media among models. Tumblr, Instagram, Twitter,Facebook, Google+, Weibo, Pose, The Fancy,Viddy, Cinemagram, and, now, Vine—she’s everywhere. She’s also a gadget girl. So it’s fitting that Rocha, the face of many brands and a magazine cover regular, is clearly no stranger to the camera. She even reached out to the forward-thinking camera company Lytro to become better acquainted with its light-field technology camera after reading about it in a blog post. She later served as a judge for the company’s Light Field Photography Contest alongside tech writers and a photographer.
And just a few weeks back, Google invited her to try out Google Glass. “I was like a kid in a candy store!” Rocha told PCMag. “I think this technology will open up a whole array of possibilities to us that we had never dreamed of.”
Rocha knows something about new possibilities. “When I started modeling 10 years ago, there were no models with social media presence, there was no social media as we have it today,” she says. “Now I don’t think a model can expect to survive without it.”Click HERE to read more.

PCMag: What Do You Carry, Supermodel Coco Rocha?

This week you’ll see the model on the runway at New York Fashion Week and on your TV on “The Face.” But every day, you’ll see her all across social media

By Chandra Steel


Model Coco Rocha is renowned in the fashion industry for her posing but when it comes to her professed love of technology, she’s clearly no poser.

Rocha is the undisputed ruler of social media among models. TumblrInstagramTwitter,FacebookGoogle+, Weibo, PoseThe Fancy,Viddy, Cinemagram, and, now, Vine—she’s everywhere. She’s also a gadget girl. So it’s fitting that Rocha, the face of many brands and a magazine cover regular, is clearly no stranger to the camera. She even reached out to the forward-thinking camera company Lytro to become better acquainted with its light-field technology camera after reading about it in a blog post. She later served as a judge for the company’s Light Field Photography Contest alongside tech writers and a photographer.

And just a few weeks back, Google invited her to try out Google Glass. “I was like a kid in a candy store!” Rocha told PCMag. “I think this technology will open up a whole array of possibilities to us that we had never dreamed of.”

Rocha knows something about new possibilities. “When I started modeling 10 years ago, there were no models with social media presence, there was no social media as we have it today,” she says. “Now I don’t think a model can expect to survive without it.”

Click HERE to read more.

ENTER THE 3rd DIMENSION - with your eyes crossed.Can you cross your eyes? If you can, then these images might work for you. You have to cross the right image with the left image and then you’ll see a full stereo 3D image in the middle. It worked for me - the depth of field is crazy!If you can’t cross your eyes, don’t worry - I’m posting more traditional 3D images in my next blog. Thanks to Eric Cheng at Lytro for sending these my way - as you might recall, they are from the amazing Lytro shoot we did a few months back. If you missed that, have a LOOK.

ENTER THE 3rd DIMENSION - with your eyes crossed.

Can you cross your eyes? If you can, then these images might work for you. You have to cross the right image with the left image and then you’ll see a full stereo 3D image in the middle. It worked for me - the depth of field is crazy!

If you can’t cross your eyes, don’t worry - I’m posting more traditional 3D images in my next blog. Thanks to Eric Cheng at Lytro for sending these my way - as you might recall, they are from the amazing Lytro shoot we did a few months back. If you missed that, have a LOOK.

LYTRO - behind-the-scenes.

Yesterday I posted some of the amazing new images we created with photographer Eric Cheng and the revolutionary LYTRO camera technology. If you haven’t seen and played with the images already, I invite you to scroll down and give them a try.  Using much more conventional camera technology, James also created a little behind-the-scenes of this Conran family shoot (James was was the Art Director and his sister Rebecca was the Stylist!).

Please notice, even my niece, Faye, makes a cameo (she’s the tiny Chihuahua).

LYTRO - click anywhere on the picture, I dare you.

Another picture in the series we created with the Lytro camera.  If you click on the picture you’ll see that with the revolutionary Lytro camera, all focusing can be done after the picture is taken.

Photographer - Eric Cheng
Stylist - Rebecca Conran
Art Director - James Conran.

LYTRO - click anywhere on the picture, I dare you.

Here’s another picture in the series we created with the Lytro camera. In this picture, at the cross roads of Broadway and 5th avenue, I’m wearing a printed jumpsuit by Tucker paired up with my own head scarf and sunglasses.

If you click on the picture you will see that with the revolutionary Lytro camera, all focusing can be done after the picture is taken.

Photographer - Eric Cheng
Stylist - Rebecca Conran
Art Director - James Conran.

LYTRO - click anywhere on the picture, I dare you.

This season, bold prints are not just for clothes. Here I’m pairing up a herring bone manicure with bright pink lips. This beauty shot is from the first EVER fashion shoot with the Lytro camera.


Photographer - Eric Cheng
Stylist - Rebecca Conran
Art Director - James Conran.

LYTRO - click anywhere on the picture, I dare you.

In this Lytro picture I wear a tunic by SUNO paried with a necklace by Coco Rocha for Senhoa! Thats right, this is also the first glimpse at my own charity jewelry line coming out later this year! If you click on the picture you’ll see that with the revolutionary Lytro camera, all focusing can be done after the picture is taken.


Photographer - Eric Cheng
Stylist - Rebecca Conran
Art Director - James Conran.

LYTRO - click anywhere on the picture, I dare you.

Three weeks ago I read an article on mashable.com about a revolutionary new camera called the LYTRO that requires no focusing whatsoever. In fact, believe it or not, all focusing can be done after the picture is taken. James and I, ever the early adopters, immediately reached out to the company producing the camera and said we would love to work with the prototype. To our excitement, the very next week Lytro was kind enough to send out photographer Eric Cheng with the camera and together with my sister-in-law Rebecca Conran as the stylist and James as Art Director we created our own little fashion shoot here in New York.

In fact, this is the first EVER fashion shoot with the Lytro camera.