It’s Not You, It’s MeSince we’re starting a new year, I know many are looking for ways to start over with their health and wellness. I’m very proud to share the launch of my sister-in-law Rebecca Conran’s holistic health coaching company called It’s Not You, It’s Me. After struggling for many years with eating disorders, alcohol and drug dependancies and unhealthy, sometimes abusive relationships, she found a path to health through holistic health coaching. She conquered her addictions, healed her relationships, got fit and, in doing so, she became passionate about wanting to share the knowledge she had garnered with others. In time she went back to school, becoming certified to help others embark on their own holistic healing journeys. If you long to achieve your personal life and health goals, she can help you find your way!www.ITSNOTYOUITSMEWELLNESSCOACHING.com

It’s Not You, It’s Me

Since we’re starting a new year, I know many are looking for ways to start over with their health and wellness. I’m very proud to share the launch of my sister-in-law Rebecca Conran’s holistic health coaching company called It’s Not You, It’s Me. After struggling for many years with eating disorders, alcohol and drug dependancies and unhealthy, sometimes abusive relationships, she found a path to health through holistic health coaching. She conquered her addictions, healed her relationships, got fit and, in doing so, she became passionate about wanting to share the knowledge she had garnered with others. In time she went back to school, becoming certified to help others embark on their own holistic healing journeys. If you long to achieve your personal life and health goals, she can help you find your way!

www.ITSNOTYOUITSMEWELLNESSCOACHING.com

Breaking News from The New York Times!

Vogue Adopts a 16-and-Over Modeling Rule

By ERIC WILSON

Beginning with their June issues, the editors of the 19 international editions of Vogue magazine have made a pact to stop using models under age 16 or those who, from the viewpoint of the editors, appear to have an eating disorder.

In a somewhat unusual announcement, unusual in that the magazines are wading into a controversial issue, the Condé Nast International chairman, Jonathan Newhouse, said on Thursday, “Vogue editors around the world want the magazines to reflect their commitment to the health of the models who appear on the pages and the well-being of their readers.”

For decades, fashion magazines have been criticized for upholding an unrealistic standard of beauty, and even more so with the widespread use of digital retouching that often results in images of models and celebrities that have no basis in reality. While Vogue editors like Anna Wintour, of the American edition, and Franca Sozzani, of Italy, have participated in recent efforts by the Council of Fashion Designers of America to promote healthier behavior in the modeling industry, the magazines have not typically issued their own standards.

The fashion council released its own guidelines to designers and modeling agencies last season, asking them not to use models younger than 16 on their runways, and most have complied. The designer Marc Jacobs, however, disagreed with the council on that point and did use some models under that age, represented by Ford Models, in his show.

The Vogue announcement included the following six-point pact.

“1. We will not knowingly work with models under the age of 16 or who appear to have an eating disorder. We will work with models who, in our view, are healthy and help to promote a healthy body image.

“2. We will ask agents not to knowingly send us underage girls and casting directors to check IDs when casting shoots, shows and campaigns.

“3. We will help to structure mentoring programs where more mature models are able to give advice and guidance to younger girls, and we will help to raise industry-wide awareness through education, as has been integral to the Council of Fashion Designers of America Health Initiative.

“4. We will encourage producers to create healthy backstage working conditions, including healthy food options and a respect for privacy. We will encourage casting agents not to keep models unreasonably late.

“5. We encourage designers to consider the consequences of unrealistically small sample sizes of their clothing, which limits the range of women who can be photographed in their clothes, and encourages the use of extremely thin models.

“6. We will be ambassadors for the message of healthy body image.”

Setting the record straight - again.

The other evening I joined an interesting group of doctors, editors, models and lawyers in order to speak with Dr. Herzog, director of the Massachusetts General Hospital, about his work with the CFDA’s Health Initiative. Along with fellow model Doutzen Kroes, I had the chance to speak before the group.

Today I’ve seen some positive and some rather negative feedback regarding the parts of my speech that have been made public. With this in mind I have decided to publish my entire speech below - Coco Rocha.

I would like to thank the Harris Center for inviting me to speak today. I’m deeply appreciative of the research, education and advocacy you provide, as well as for your outreach program to the CFDA.

I’m sure to many in the audience, my industry - fashion - must appear to be something like the Wild West. Specifically within the field of modeling, a smaller part of that industry, we are essentially entirely unregulated and this is the way it’s been for a long time now. The models who make up this highly visual workforce are mostly teenage girls, many of whom are largely seen as disposable commodities. It’s no secret that there’s an immense pressure put on these girls to maintain a specific look and, for quite a while now, that specific look has been impossibly thin. Models know they have a shelf-life, and they know that if they can’t maintain the look, they will be replaced.

Often the pressure is very direct with some designers, stylists and agents in no uncertain terms, pushing these young girls to take measures that often lead to anorexia or other health problems in order to remain in the business a few extra seasons. I myself felt this pressure very early in my career as a fashion model. I recall being specifically told by someone of authority, much older and supposedly wiser than I, that the “look” that year was anorexia. He said to me, “We don’t want you to be anorexic but that’s what we want you to look like.”  For a young girl of 15 you can imagine how confusing and disturbing that statement was.

A large part of the problem is that models come into this business at 13, 14 or 15, before their bodies are even close to being finished developing. Often they are the tall, skinny girls in middle school, with none of the curves that they will one day inherit. Within a year or two these girls are developing into women and they are not told that this is OK. On the contrary, they’re told that they are losing their edge, losing money, and losing favor in the eyes of their clients, and so they struggle to take measures that will please those they look up to. When I was younger, many miles away from home, I turned to diuretic pills to lose weight. One day, I took so many on an empty stomach that I spent hours doubled over and racked with pain. At that time I promised myself that I would never again take such drastic measures in order to please others.

To this day I question how anyone can justify an aesthetic that reduces a woman or child to an emaciated skeleton. Surely fashion’s aesthetic should enhance and beautify the human form, not destroy it.

Why should there be a difference between being healthy and being a model? In my mind, the two should be one and the same. We demand and we legislate that our sports stars achieve success without the use of dangerous drugs and supplements that would otherwise harm their bodies in the long run. Why should we not encourage and even require that our runway and editorial stars also hold themselves to a higher standard?

Read More

BODY PEACE AWARDLast week Seventeen magazine had an award ceremony recognizing the people they are partenering with to promote healthy body image for girls. I unfortunately missed the event as I was back home in Vancouver, but when I returned home this gorgeous award designed by Jonathan Adler was waiting for me. I’m very proud of it and of the entire cause in general. Thank you Seventeen magazine!

BODY PEACE AWARD

Last week Seventeen magazine had an award ceremony recognizing the people they are partenering with to promote healthy body image for girls. I unfortunately missed the event as I was back home in Vancouver, but when I returned home this gorgeous award designed by Jonathan Adler was waiting for me. I’m very proud of it and of the entire cause in general. Thank you Seventeen magazine!

NEW YORK JOURNAL OF STYLE AND MEDICINE

Taken from the NYJSM

NYJSM interview with one of the most recognizable names and faces in the industry right now. Elite Model, Coco Rocha Conran needs no introduction.

Dr. Vasey: How do you balance health and fitness while working in the industry?

Coco: Well no matter what is “in or out” in the industry, for me its very important to be fit, healthy and ultimately, to be happy. If my look isn’t what someone wants for a job, its fine, I know through experience that there’s always someone else in line who’ll like my look.

Dr. Vasey: Has health and fitness played a significant role in your life from the start of your career or something that evolved over the years?

Coco: I started out in this industry at 15 - I was young and knew little about what constituted a healthy diet and routine. There were those who tried to steer me into negative habits but there were also those who taught me good body image and positive healthy living. I think its important that kids today have positive influences to counteract the negative, that’s one of the reasons I’m teaming up with Seventeen magazine to be part of their Body Peace Council.

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The Beauty Of Healthby Coco RochaTomorrow night I’ve been invited to attend the CFDA’s yearly panel discussion on health, this time entitiled “The Beauty Of Health: Resizing The Sample Size”. As some of you might know, two years ago I had the chance to speak at this event and voice my thoughts and concerns, to mixed reviews.Since that time I’ve felt it was very important for me to continue to speak up on the issues surrounding the health of models in my industry. In 2010, with both the CFDA and Vogue’s support, I’m making a special effort to find new ways to address the subject. Whether this means public speaking, one on one discussions or more topic specific blogs like this, I’m looking for ways to reach out and help.I’m excited to see what the speakers and guests have to say tomorrow night but I also want to hear from you - Please let me know your thoughts and ideas of how I can be effective in reaching out this year. Let’s put 2010 in the books as the year we changed fashion for the better.

The Beauty Of Health
by Coco Rocha

Tomorrow night I’ve been invited to attend the CFDA’s yearly panel discussion on health, this time entitiled “The Beauty Of Health: Resizing The Sample Size”. As some of you might know, two years ago I had the chance to speak at this event and voice my thoughts and concerns, to mixed reviews.

Since that time I’ve felt it was very important for me to continue to speak up on the issues surrounding the health of models in my industry. In 2010, with both the CFDA and Vogue’s support, I’m making a special effort to find new ways to address the subject. Whether this means public speaking, one on one discussions or more topic specific blogs like this, I’m looking for ways to reach out and help.

I’m excited to see what the speakers and guests have to say tomorrow night but I also want to hear from you - Please let me know your thoughts and ideas of how I can be effective in reaching out this year. Let’s put 2010 in the books as the year we changed fashion for the better.