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Flare Magazine kept me pretty busy for their October issue, and I can’t complain. It’s not every day that I get to serve as the guest editor for a magazine I’m on the cover of! If you want a sneak peak of my role as the art director for a roller-disco themed editorial, keep an eye on my blog next week. For now, check out my full interview with Flare where I share a few insider secrets. Xx

Flare Magazine October 2014

The multi-talented model, social media master and guest editor of FLARE shares the lessons that transformed her from a nerdy B.C. girl into a fashion revolutionary.

Modelling is one of few jobs in which a 26-year-old can celebrate over 10 years at the top of her profession. When a scout discovered Coco Rocha in Vancouver, she was, by her own description, “a dorky 14-year-old who didn’t know left from right.” By 15, she had signed with her first agency; by 17, she’d landed an exclusive contract with career-making photographer Steven Meisel; and at 18, she Irish jigged her way down Jean Paul Gaultier’s runway—and onto the cover of Vogue, where she was named among the next generation of top models. Since then, she’s walked in over 300 shows and appeared on more than 100 magazine covers.

She’s also redefined modeldom for the millennial set. One of the first in her field to embrace social media, she’s made her voice as important as her supernaturally chiseled cheekbones for the benefit of almost 14 million followers, and she’s become a powerful advocate for the up-and-coming cohort of aspiring Cocos. Last year, she helped pass a New York labour law to improve working conditions for underage models. This month, she’ll add author to her résumé, with a 1,000-photo coffee table tome called Study of Pose. Even more impressively, she’s accomplished all of this on her own terms: you won’t see nudity or overt sexuality in any of her photos.

But beneath the powerhouse exterior, Rocha has always had an alluring oddball quality—a glimmer of that gawky teen, a flash of self-aware wit—that shines through in our shoot and behind-the-scenes video below at the Dream hotel in New York City. (Rocha wanted to capture the civilian encounters she’s had over the years while leaving and returning to hotel rooms, glammed up in full photo-shoot regalia.)

And so, to mark her industry-changing decade in fashion, we asked Rocha to trace her evolution from a naïve B.C. kid to a bona fide brand. Here, 10 lessons that shaped Coco Rocha.

Know Your Designers

One of my first runway jobs was opening a DKNY show. I was 18 and knew nothing about Donna Karan. But I must have done well because I was asked to open her second show—for her main line, Donna Karan—a few days later. I went to the fitting, and Donna was there, and she looked at me and said, “Mmm … Donna must love you.” She was referring to herself in the third person, but I thought, Oh, so this isn’t Donna. Donna must be her sister, who had me open the first show, therefore this must be Karan. For a year or two after, I assumed Donna and Karan were twin sisters who had two different lines. I only realized I was wrong when

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FLARE: First cover of 2012Fashion Director: Elizabeth CabralArt Director: Tanya WattPhotographer: Chris NichollsFlare’s February issue is out today! To see more of the editorial and to read their exclusive interview with me, go buy your copy of Flare on newsstands now!As a teaser, you can find a few pictures from the editorial on my Facebook page (HERE).

FLARE: First cover of 2012

Fashion Director: Elizabeth Cabral

Art Director: Tanya Watt
Photographer: Chris Nicholls

Flare’s February issue is out today! To see more of the editorial and to read their exclusive interview with me, go buy your copy of Flare on newsstands now!

As a teaser, you can find a few pictures from the editorial on my Facebook page (HERE).

FLARE - February 2012

The other day I showed you the cover and now I’m happy to show you the whole Flare editorial! I always love working with Flare and I’m so so thankful for their support in my charitable efforts this past year - GO HERE to read about our partnership for Haiti.

It was also great to work with photographer Chris Nicholls again. Together with Flare Magazine, Liz Cabral and my husband James Conran, we won the National Magazine Award for our last editorial together! GO HERE to see that.

Fashion Director: Elizabeth Cabral
Art Director: Tanya Watt
Photographer: Chris Nicholls

CANADA: Win tickets to the premiere of “Letters to Haiti”Together with FLARE Magazine I’m proud to announce the exclusive event where I will premiere my new  documentary, “Letters to Haiti,” on Thursday, October 13th. The film follows Behati Prinsloo and I as we visited Haiti, one year after a terrible earthquake ravaged the landscape. (To see the trailer go HERE.)You and a guest could win tickets to the invite-only red carpet event and screening at the Ritz-Carlton Hotel in Toronto. You could also be selected to take home a limited edition print photo by Behati Prinsloo herself! To enter, go to FLARE.com right now! Entries open today and close October 9th, so hurry!!
*Contest is open to residents of Ontario only who are over 19 years  of age. Winner will be selected randomly and will take place at FLARE’s offices on October 10, 2011.P.s. If you don’t make it to the event in person, we’ll be live streaming “Letters to Haiti”’ across Canada exclusively on  FLARE.com the evening of the event. The film begins at 8:00PM on October  13th. To read more about LakayPAM go HERE.

CANADA: Win tickets to the premiere of “Letters to Haiti

Together with FLARE Magazine I’m proud to announce the exclusive event where I will premiere my new documentary, “Letters to Haiti,” on Thursday, October 13th. The film follows Behati Prinsloo and I as we visited Haiti, one year after a terrible earthquake ravaged the landscape. (To see the trailer go HERE.)

You and a guest could win tickets to the invite-only red carpet event and screening at the Ritz-Carlton Hotel in Toronto. You could also be selected to take home a limited edition print photo by Behati Prinsloo herself! To enter, go to FLARE.com right now! Entries open today and close October 9th, so hurry!!

*Contest is open to residents of Ontario only who are over 19 years of age. Winner will be selected randomly and will take place at FLARE’s offices on October 10, 2011.

P.s. If you don’t make it to the event in person, we’ll be live streaming “Letters to Haiti”’ across Canada exclusively on FLARE.com the evening of the event. The film begins at 8:00PM on October 13th. To read more about LakayPAM go HERE.

NATIONAL MAGAZINE AWARD WINNER - A big congratulations to the team at FLARE Magazine for winning the GOLD for Fashion Editorial at the National Magazine Awards the other night!Photographer: Chris Nicholls Stylist: Liz Cabral Model: Coco Rocha Art: James ConranYou might be a little surprised by the last name on that list - when we did the shoot over a year ago, James came on set with me and thought he was just going to have a relaxing day reading his book while I worked! It turned out Chris, the photographer, heard James was an artist and asked him to draw chalk backgrounds for every shot we took. The whole project turned out great and I am so proud of the entire team for winning this award.The shoot is documented on THIS VIDEO so please watch that for more information.

NATIONAL MAGAZINE AWARD WINNER - A big congratulations to the team at FLARE Magazine for winning the GOLD for Fashion Editorial at the National Magazine Awards the other night!

Photographer: Chris Nicholls
Stylist: Liz Cabral
Model: Coco Rocha
Art: James Conran

You might be a little surprised by the last name on that list - when we did the shoot over a year ago, James came on set with me and thought he was just going to have a relaxing day reading his book while I worked! It turned out Chris, the photographer, heard James was an artist and asked him to draw chalk backgrounds for every shot we took. The whole project turned out great and I am so proud of the entire team for winning this award.

The shoot is documented on THIS VIDEO so please watch that for more information.

A few weeks ago I posted a teaser of the journal I wrote documenting my trip to Haiti. If you haven’t been able to get your hands on a copy of the issue of FLARE magazine where my journal and Behati Prinsloo’s photos were printed, here is the text in full.  Please do read it:LETTER FROM HAITIBy Coco Rocha I first saw the reports of the massive earthquake in Haiti a little over a year ago. I was sitting in an airport and I’ll never  forget the shocking scenes of destruction, death and chaos. I knew I had  to do something. Since then, I’ve been helping raise money in New York  for a non-profit organization called LakayPAM (“my home”). It helps  provide more than 500 orphans in Haiti with shelter, food, medical care and education. Despite  our success with fundraising events in New York, I still felt very  distant and disconnected from the people and the children I was trying  to help.  What I really wanted was to actually see the children of Haiti.  My husband, James, and I started planning our trip last year. The first  person we enlisted to join us was my good friend and fellow model Behati  Prinsloo. I asked Behati because she has such a  big heart. A few years  ago, I had a great time helping her at her dad’s soup kitchen in  Namibia, Africa. She gladly signed on as our trip’s photographer. The  next person we called was Gilbert Le, the filmmaker who created our  beautiful wedding film last summer. He and his cinematographer, Ben, were  on board to meet us in New York when we headed down to Haiti in mid-January. As  I started gathering the toys I wanted to give to the children, I  thought about what they really needed. It occurred to me that many of  the orphans had lost so many people in their lives that what they  probably needed most was the love of another human being. I decided to  create a pen pal program to deliver these children messages of hope and  love from other kids. I put the word out on my blog (oh-so-coco.tumblr.com)  and letters immediately started flooding in from every corner of the  globe. In the final week before our trip I spent most evenings hunched  over my computer, reading, editing and translating every letter into  French - the language most children are taught to read in Haiti.  January 22 A  final batch of letters arrives from a French school in Canada - they  make my translation job that much easier. They are from very young  school children and are absolutely adorable. Most start by saying their  name and grade, and then explaining how many brothers and sisters they  have, or how desperately they want a dog. They talk about their favorite  sport, color or how they love to dance, read and write. All of the  children explain how they’re thinking of the Haitian children, thousands  of miles away, and that although times are rough, they will eventually  get better. They all end with “Please write me back.” I hope they do! January 23 My agent, Micki, and Behati are downstairs waiting at 6:30am, and we all head to the airport. I am surprised by how close Haiti is - it’s just a three-hour flight from New York. As we descend, I see  what looks like a tropical paradise: beaches, blue sea, lush greenery  and, in the distance, a massive city in the bay. As we get closer, I  begin to make out the details of Port-au-Prince. What I thought were  houses are actually makeshift tents, thousands of them, one stacked on  top of the next.  Moments before we land it becomes clear to me  that what looked so perfect from afar is actually in total chaos.  Stepping off the plane, I’m immediately hit by a wall of heat. At the  airport, we see our first example of the earthquake’s power.  Most of  the terminal is cracked and zoned unsafe so the customs and immigration  have been moved to a makeshift hangar a bus ride away. I say “makeshift”  but a year later this is probably as permanent as they can expect. We  leave the airport for our first trip through Port-au-Prince. People are  everywhere, and piles of rubble are heaped in the middle of what were  once major roadways. There are no rules to the road as James learns to  navigate the madness of the streets. To my right we pass a massive tent  city in what was once a beautiful city park. All I can see are tents and  the smell is of rotting garbage and unsanitary conditions. I see a  woman bathing her baby in the gutter. The sheer number of people living  this way is staggering. Across the street from the tent city is the  former Haitian Palace. It looks like it was once the size and grandeur  of the White House but now appears to be a giant heap of stones - as  fitting a symbol as I can imagine for this country’s state.  January 24 After  breakfast, we head to Oeuvre Notres Dames Des Victoires, an orphanage  with a school in the heart of Port Au Prince. Before the earthquake, the  complex consisted of two buildings: a school in the back and an  orphanage in the front. The earthquake destroyed one of the two  buildings so now all 400 children are crammed into half the space. Some  classes are being held in what would have ordinarily been hallways. The  cafeteria is now home to about five different classes and we hear the  teachers reading the words off the chalk board and the children  repeating them in a haunting chant.  Apparently, many babies  have begun showing up at orphanages in the last few months - the result  of rape in the madness following the earthquake. Half of them are  sleeping, a few are quietly playing, but one just keeps crying. I’m told  that he arrived today and doesn’t understand what is going on. No one  is holding him - he has a painful rash all over his body. I try to  comfort him, brushing my fingers against his little fingers. It’s  devastating to see him suffering like this, so alone.  Outside,  hundreds of children are leaving their classes. Behati and I spend an  hour playing, dancing and taking lots of pictures in the hot midday sun.  There is nothing as contagious as the happiness of a child. After a  very depressing tour of the city, this visit is exactly what we need. After  leaving the school in Port-Au-Prince, we head up the mountain to a tiny  orphanage, Orphelinat Souer Solange, of 22 children that LakayPAM  supports. We give them all gifts: model airplanes, yo-yos, bouncy  balls, art supplies and stickers. Once they realize that they can keep  the toys, they are ecstatic. A circle of about eight girls forms around  me as they immediately get to work on their drawings.  Before we  leave, the children get together to sing a song they have made up. At  first they are a little shy but by the end they are belting out the  tune. I get goosebumps and can’t stop smiling.  January 25 We  wake up before dawn and head back to the orphanage up in the hills. Our  little friends are already either eating breakfast or standing in line  to have sunscreen applied. I learn that all children must wear a uniform  in order to attend school. I think of the children living in the tent  city I saw yesterday. How could they afford a uniform? I spin one little  girl around in the backyard. Putting her down, another little girl  waits with her hands out. Next, every child wants to be spun around  again and again and again. Behati joins me and we spin until we can’t  see straight.  After our good-byes we travel back to the big  school in Port-au-Prince. Today, we’re giving the children the letters.  We bring a map of the world and explain to the five- and six-year old  kids that these letters are from children all around the world. I don’t  think they understand my pen pal concept but they love having us around.  As we hand out the letters - mainly drawings with few words - they  excitedly show them to each other. The teacher promises that the  children will draw pictures in return. The next room is packed with more  than fifty children who listen carefully as I explain the concept of  the letters. Once they start reading - and can see that strangers care  about them - I can see the excitement in their eyes. My hours of  translating are worth every thrilled little face. January 26 Today  we walk around the city. Every street is full of people selling and  trading random things like fruit, cups or shoes… sometimes all three on  one table. We walk around the outskirts of a tent city - it’s too  dangerous to go much further. A lady takes us into her tent so that we  can see how she lives. I see a bed made of a flat tin sheet elevated off  the ground (and out of the rain water) with a few old blankets. Clothes  hang from the ceiling and a small hot plate is tucked in a corner.  Our  final stop of the trip is a soccer camp that LakayPAM funds. It’s a  long drive and when we arrive, about a hundred young boys are  practising. For many of these boys, the food they get at camp is the  only real meal they will get that day. Behati and I start kicking around  a ball with some little boys off to one side and before I know it, I’m  drawn into the game. Before leaving, we hand out 15 soccer balls that  Micki has brought. They are so thrilled to have extra balls to practise  with.  January 27 As we leave Haiti,  I’m struck by what I did not see. Other than a few old women trying to  sweep piles of rubble and dust, I didn’t see any significant clean-up  efforts. I can remember just one occasion where I witnessed any  construction and that was at the school in Port-au-Prince. If you asked  the average Canadian, I suspect they would think that the worst of Haiti's  troubles are over - but it seems like nothing much is happening. A year  has already passed since the earthquake struck; I just hope that we  don't allow an entire generation of children to grow up in this chaos.  Haiti has to stay in our minds and hearts. If this trip proved one thing to me,  it’s that the children still need us, and I will not give up. By Coco Rocha*Flare has donated Coco and Behati’s writing and photography fees to LakayPAM. For more information and to donate, visit Lakaypam.org

A few weeks ago I posted a teaser of the journal I wrote documenting my trip to Haiti. If you haven’t been able to get your hands on a copy of the issue of FLARE magazine where my journal and Behati Prinsloo’s photos were printed, here is the text in full.  Please do read it:

LETTER FROM HAITI
By Coco Rocha

I first saw the reports of the massive earthquake in Haiti a little over a year ago. I was sitting in an airport and I’ll never forget the shocking scenes of destruction, death and chaos. I knew I had to do something. Since then, I’ve been helping raise money in New York for a non-profit organization called LakayPAM (“my home”). It helps provide more than 500 orphans in Haiti with shelter, food, medical care and education.
 
Despite our success with fundraising events in New York, I still felt very distant and disconnected from the people and the children I was trying to help.  What I really wanted was to actually see the children of Haiti. My husband, James, and I started planning our trip last year. The first person we enlisted to join us was my good friend and fellow model Behati Prinsloo. I asked Behati because she has such a  big heart. A few years ago, I had a great time helping her at her dad’s soup kitchen in Namibia, Africa. She gladly signed on as our trip’s photographer. The next person we called was Gilbert Le, the filmmaker who created our beautiful wedding film last summer. He and his cinematographer, Ben, were on board to meet us in New York when we headed down to Haiti in mid-January.
 
As I started gathering the toys I wanted to give to the children, I thought about what they really needed. It occurred to me that many of the orphans had lost so many people in their lives that what they probably needed most was the love of another human being. I decided to create a pen pal program to deliver these children messages of hope and love from other kids. I put the word out on my blog (oh-so-coco.tumblr.com) and letters immediately started flooding in from every corner of the globe. In the final week before our trip I spent most evenings hunched over my computer, reading, editing and translating every letter into French - the language most children are taught to read in Haiti.
 
January 22
 
A final batch of letters arrives from a French school in Canada - they make my translation job that much easier. They are from very young school children and are absolutely adorable. Most start by saying their name and grade, and then explaining how many brothers and sisters they have, or how desperately they want a dog. They talk about their favorite sport, color or how they love to dance, read and write. All of the children explain how they’re thinking of the Haitian children, thousands of miles away, and that although times are rough, they will eventually get better. They all end with “Please write me back.” I hope they do!
 
January 23
 
My agent, Micki, and Behati are downstairs waiting at 6:30am, and we all head to the airport. I am surprised by how close Haiti is - it’s just a three-hour flight from New York. As we descend, I see what looks like a tropical paradise: beaches, blue sea, lush greenery and, in the distance, a massive city in the bay. As we get closer, I begin to make out the details of Port-au-Prince. What I thought were houses are actually makeshift tents, thousands of them, one stacked on top of the next.
 
Moments before we land it becomes clear to me that what looked so perfect from afar is actually in total chaos. Stepping off the plane, I’m immediately hit by a wall of heat. At the airport, we see our first example of the earthquake’s power.  Most of the terminal is cracked and zoned unsafe so the customs and immigration have been moved to a makeshift hangar a bus ride away. I say “makeshift” but a year later this is probably as permanent as they can expect. We leave the airport for our first trip through Port-au-Prince. People are everywhere, and piles of rubble are heaped in the middle of what were once major roadways. There are no rules to the road as James learns to navigate the madness of the streets. To my right we pass a massive tent city in what was once a beautiful city park. All I can see are tents and the smell is of rotting garbage and unsanitary conditions. I see a woman bathing her baby in the gutter. The sheer number of people living this way is staggering. Across the street from the tent city is the former Haitian Palace. It looks like it was once the size and grandeur of the White House but now appears to be a giant heap of stones - as fitting a symbol as I can imagine for this country’s state.
 
January 24
 
After breakfast, we head to Oeuvre Notres Dames Des Victoires, an orphanage with a school in the heart of Port Au Prince. Before the earthquake, the complex consisted of two buildings: a school in the back and an orphanage in the front. The earthquake destroyed one of the two buildings so now all 400 children are crammed into half the space. Some classes are being held in what would have ordinarily been hallways. The cafeteria is now home to about five different classes and we hear the teachers reading the words off the chalk board and the children repeating them in a haunting chant.
 
Apparently, many babies have begun showing up at orphanages in the last few months - the result of rape in the madness following the earthquake. Half of them are sleeping, a few are quietly playing, but one just keeps crying. I’m told that he arrived today and doesn’t understand what is going on. No one is holding him - he has a painful rash all over his body. I try to comfort him, brushing my fingers against his little fingers. It’s devastating to see him suffering like this, so alone.
 
Outside, hundreds of children are leaving their classes. Behati and I spend an hour playing, dancing and taking lots of pictures in the hot midday sun. There is nothing as contagious as the happiness of a child. After a very depressing tour of the city, this visit is exactly what we need.
 
After leaving the school in Port-Au-Prince, we head up the mountain to a tiny orphanage, Orphelinat Souer Solange, of 22 children that LakayPAM supports. We give them all gifts: model airplanes, yo-yos, bouncy balls, art supplies and stickers. Once they realize that they can keep the toys, they are ecstatic. A circle of about eight girls forms around me as they immediately get to work on their drawings.
 
Before we leave, the children get together to sing a song they have made up. At first they are a little shy but by the end they are belting out the tune. I get goosebumps and can’t stop smiling.
 
January 25
 
We wake up before dawn and head back to the orphanage up in the hills. Our little friends are already either eating breakfast or standing in line to have sunscreen applied. I learn that all children must wear a uniform in order to attend school. I think of the children living in the tent city I saw yesterday. How could they afford a uniform? I spin one little girl around in the backyard. Putting her down, another little girl waits with her hands out. Next, every child wants to be spun around again and again and again. Behati joins me and we spin until we can’t see straight.
 
After our good-byes we travel back to the big school in Port-au-Prince. Today, we’re giving the children the letters. We bring a map of the world and explain to the five- and six-year old kids that these letters are from children all around the world. I don’t think they understand my pen pal concept but they love having us around. As we hand out the letters - mainly drawings with few words - they excitedly show them to each other. The teacher promises that the children will draw pictures in return. The next room is packed with more than fifty children who listen carefully as I explain the concept of the letters. Once they start reading - and can see that strangers care about them - I can see the excitement in their eyes. My hours of translating are worth every thrilled little face.
 
January 26
 
Today we walk around the city. Every street is full of people selling and trading random things like fruit, cups or shoes… sometimes all three on one table. We walk around the outskirts of a tent city - it’s too dangerous to go much further. A lady takes us into her tent so that we can see how she lives. I see a bed made of a flat tin sheet elevated off the ground (and out of the rain water) with a few old blankets. Clothes hang from the ceiling and a small hot plate is tucked in a corner.
 
Our final stop of the trip is a soccer camp that LakayPAM funds. It’s a long drive and when we arrive, about a hundred young boys are practising. For many of these boys, the food they get at camp is the only real meal they will get that day. Behati and I start kicking around a ball with some little boys off to one side and before I know it, I’m drawn into the game. Before leaving, we hand out 15 soccer balls that Micki has brought. They are so thrilled to have extra balls to practise with.
 
January 27
 
As we leave Haiti, I’m struck by what I did not see. Other than a few old women trying to sweep piles of rubble and dust, I didn’t see any significant clean-up efforts. I can remember just one occasion where I witnessed any construction and that was at the school in Port-au-Prince. If you asked the average Canadian, I suspect they would think that the worst of Haiti's troubles are over - but it seems like nothing much is happening. A year has already passed since the earthquake struck; I just hope that we don't allow an entire generation of children to grow up in this chaos.
 
Haiti has to stay in our minds and hearts. If this trip proved one thing to me, it’s that the children still need us, and I will not give up.
 
By Coco Rocha

*Flare has donated Coco and Behati’s writing and photography fees to LakayPAM. For more information and to donate, visit Lakaypam.org

TEEN VOGUE - May 2011 issueThank you to Teen Vogue who joins this month’s Flare magazine in covering the trip to Haiti Behati and I recently made. Stay tuned to this blog for my diary of the entire experience (For Canada, it’s available in the pages of Flare right now) and for a very special short film my husband and I are producing.

TEEN VOGUE - May 2011 issue

Thank you to Teen Vogue who joins this month’s Flare magazine in covering the trip to Haiti Behati and I recently made. Stay tuned to this blog for my diary of the entire experience (For Canada, it’s available in the pages of Flare right now) and for a very special short film my husband and I are producing.

Letter From Haiti- My diary in this month’s Flare.It’s now been 3 months since my trip to Haiti and I’m sure a few of you have been wondering what it was like. I’m very pleased to let you know that Flare magazine has offered to print my entire diary of the trip in a special article, out this month. In the article you’ll also find the photography of my good friend Behati Prinsloo, which I can tell you is absolutely beautiful. I’d like to thank Flare for giving me the opportunity to share my message with its readers, and I’d also like to thank them publicly for the very gracious donation they made to the actual orphanages we visited.Please go out and get your copy today, I promise it’s a good read! If you don’t have access to Flare magazine, I will be posting the diary on here in a month’s time. I’m also excited to let you know that James is hard at work on putting together our first documentary - a film all about our special project in Haiti!

Letter From Haiti
- My diary in this month’s Flare.

It’s now been 3 months since my trip to Haiti and I’m sure a few of you have been wondering what it was like. I’m very pleased to let you know that Flare magazine has offered to print my entire diary of the trip in a special article, out this month. In the article you’ll also find the photography of my good friend Behati Prinsloo, which I can tell you is absolutely beautiful.

I’d like to thank Flare for giving me the opportunity to share my message with its readers, and I’d also like to thank them publicly for the very gracious donation they made to the actual orphanages we visited.

Please go out and get your copy today, I promise it’s a good read! If you don’t have access to Flare magazine, I will be posting the diary on here in a month’s time. I’m also excited to let you know that James is hard at work on putting together our first documentary - a film all about our special project in Haiti!

James & I at Flare
by Coco Rocha

A few months ago I took James to my Flare magazine shoot up in Toronto. There he was sat all cozy, reading his book and sipping on his coffee, thinking he was just going to take it easy while I worked all day!! Well word spread on set that James was an artist with a background in murals and so pretty early in the day he was recruited to draw on the giant chalk board behind me. By lunchtime he was covered in chalk dust and still drawing up a storm. All together I think he drew at least 8 unique backdrops that corresponded to the outfits I was wearing. We had such a great time working together! It was interesting to see how he was inspired by the clothing to draw the backdrop, and I in turn was inspired by the backdrop to model the clothing! Here’s a behind the scenes video from Flare, but go buy your copy now for all the pictures!