Hello from Hong Kong! I just had a great day of media interviews inanticipation of my role as Mary Kay’s guest judge at tomorrows #MKDreamBeautiful competition here. Models and makeup artists from 9 countries will be in attendance. My dress today is Sass And Bide and my shoes are by Jimmy Choo.

You can shop the look here!

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Hello from Hong Kong! I just had a great day of media interviews in
anticipation of my role as Mary Kay’s guest judge at tomorrows #MKDreamBeautiful competition here. Models and makeup artists from 9 countries will be in attendance. My dress today is Sass And Bide and my shoes are by Jimmy Choo.

You can shop the look here!

image

If you can’t tell, I’m pretty excited about my guest editoriship of this months Flare magazine. Last week I shared the cover and the editorial I had the privilege of art directing, and now I’m including some behind-the-scenes footage of my shoot at the Dream hotel in New York. Welcome to Hotel Coco… xx

L’Officiel Italia - September 2014

I’m a little late on this but I wanted to share with you my editorial for the September issue of L’Officiel because its one of my favorites of the season. I love the drama and theatrics of this shoot, and worth noting is that most of the special effects were done on set - not in post production. plus, how cool is that film strip collage of poses?! There are more where that came from in my new book the Study of Pose, coming out in October but available for (super discounted) pre-sale right HERE!

Photographer: Kristian Schuller
Stylist: Peggy Schuller
Hair: Yusef Williams
Make-up: Stefanie Willmann
Model: Coco Rocha

Good morning everyone! I’m going to try something new on my blog - every Sunday I’ll be sharing an encounter from my earlier modeling days. I encourage all of you to also share a funny or embarrassing story with me including the hashtag #SUNDAYSTORIES. So, let’s start our day with a cup of coffee and chat! Xx Coco

One of my first runway jobs was opening a DKNY show. I was 18 and knew nothing about Donna Karan. But I must have done well because I was asked to open her second show - for her main line, Donna Karan - a few days later. I went to the fitting, and Donna was there, and she looked at me and said, “Mmm … Donna must love you.” She was referring to herself in the third person, so naturally I thought, Oh, so this isn’t Donna. Donna must be her sister, who had me open the first show, therefore this must be Karan. For a year or two after, I assumed Donna and Karan were twin sisters who had two different lines. I only realized I was wrong when a friend of mine, who isn’t even in the fashion industry, told me Donna Karan is the name of one person. I’m just glad I never asked Donna about her sister Karan…

Good morning everyone! I’m going to try something new on my blog - every Sunday I’ll be sharing an encounter from my earlier modeling days. I encourage all of you to also share a funny or embarrassing story with me including the hashtag #SUNDAYSTORIES. So, let’s start our day with a cup of coffee and chat! Xx Coco

One of my first runway jobs was opening a DKNY show. I was 18 and knew nothing about Donna Karan. But I must have done well because I was asked to open her second show - for her main line, Donna Karan - a few days later. I went to the fitting, and Donna was there, and she looked at me and said, “Mmm … Donna must love you.” She was referring to herself in the third person, so naturally I thought, Oh, so this isn’t Donna. Donna must be her sister, who had me open the first show, therefore this must be Karan. For a year or two after, I assumed Donna and Karan were twin sisters who had two different lines. I only realized I was wrong when a friend of mine, who isn’t even in the fashion industry, told me Donna Karan is the name of one person. I’m just glad I never asked Donna about her sister Karan…

NYFW via INSTAGRAM - September 4th to 10th

It feels like just yesterday that I was starting off fashion week (month?) in New York. Here’s look back to when I took my new haircut for spin around the city for fashion’s favorite time of year. Xx

  1. Veronica Chu giving me the graphic bob look today at #NYFW.
  2. Backstage at the Supima Design Competition where I hosted the design challenge. So excited to see this years collections. 
  3. Ready for my mind to be blown at this years #DesignDisrupted
  4. Ready for a 3D extravaganza at Rebecca Minkoff’s S/S ‘15 collection. 
  5. Just candidly chillin’ backstage at Christian Siriano with Brad Walsh and Veronica Chu, NBD. 
  6. Bravo and congrats to my friend Christian Siriano on a gorgeous collection. 
  7. An elegant start to the day at Carolina Herrera. Lots of interesting cut outs on mesh. 
  8. Filming with these lovely ladies at Lincoln Center. Had a great laugh with Zanna Rassi, Kimora Lee Simmons, and OrlyShani!
  9. WE DID IT! #ZacPosen
  10. My look for the second half of the day at NYFW is Diesel Black & Gold.
  11. This day at NYFW I’m wearing my Bauble Bar ear cuff which is now available in brand new colors. Go to BaubleBar.com to check it out, available for just a short time. #ohsococoBB

Vogue Italia - October 2014

Earlier this week I posted my latest Italian Vogue editorial with Steven Meisel, now here’s the video in all its “shape shifting” glory. Love these models and this styling by the great Karl Templer. Shout out to the beauty dream team of Guido Palau and Pat McGrath! 

SHAPE SHIFT

Photographer: Steven Meisel

Stylist: Karl Templer

Hair: Guido Palau

Make-up: Pat McGrath

Models: Coco Rocha, Karlie Kloss, Lexi Boling, Sasha Pivovarova, & Aymeline Valade

TRAVEL via INSTAGRAM  - August 18th to 31st

This summer I traveled to some of the most beautiful places on the other side of the planet. Turkey and Africa treated me to beautiful sunsets, air balloons, hot springs, and my new best friend - a camel. Follow me on Instagram @cocorocha for photos of my next vacation! Xx

  1. Witnessed another amazing sunset over Cappadocia tonight.
  2. Fire in the sky at the crack of dawn.
  3. The thunderstorm has literally left my hair standing on end. Is this normal?!
  4. Chilling out.
  5. At Pamukkale, meaning “cotton castle” in Turkish. People have bathed in these natural hot spring pools for thousands of years!
  6. Beach day today and nothing else. Need a mini vacation from my vacation!☀️
  7. Taking in the view.
  8. You can stand under my umbrella, ella. #Fethiye #Turkey
  9. He pretending he doesn’t like me but deep down I know he does.
This month my mom Rocky and I had our first ever shoot together for People magazine. Actually, as I was a couple weeks pregnant at the time, I guess you could say this picture has 3 generations in it! Take a peek at our interview below:

People Magazine - October 2014
Models and Their Moms 
The supermodel, whose book Study of Pose hits shelves Oct. 28, credits her mom for teaching her how to embrace makeup (sort of) and balance her beliefs with her bookings.
Coco: I was a nerdy Irish dancer in school, so modeling was the last thing on my mind. 
Rocky: I dressed her in princess dresses, so whether she wanted to be a girlie girl or not, she was forced to be! 
Coco: I hated to shop. And I screamed when she put stage makeup on. 
Rocky: She got a few hairbrushes upside the head too! 
Coco: Thanks to her I learned to let makeup artists do their job. She also taught me how to do makeup, so when I went to castings I could put a little on. But when I started modeling, what I did notice is my mom had no sense of style. 
Rocky: Now I like her clothes, and she likes mine. 
Coco: And now we have the exact same hair. It’s quite funny.

This month my mom Rocky and I had our first ever shoot together for People magazine. Actually, as I was a couple weeks pregnant at the time, I guess you could say this picture has 3 generations in it! Take a peek at our interview below:

People Magazine - October 2014

Models and Their Moms

The supermodel, whose book Study of Pose hits shelves Oct. 28, credits her mom for teaching her how to embrace makeup (sort of) and balance her beliefs with her bookings.

Coco: I was a nerdy Irish dancer in school, so modeling was the last thing on my mind.

Rocky: I dressed her in princess dresses, so whether she wanted to be a girlie girl or not, she was forced to be!

Coco: I hated to shop. And I screamed when she put stage makeup on.

Rocky: She got a few hairbrushes upside the head too!

Coco: Thanks to her I learned to let makeup artists do their job. She also taught me how to do makeup, so when I went to castings I could put a little on. But when I started modeling, what I did notice is my mom had no sense of style.

Rocky: Now I like her clothes, and she likes mine.

Coco: And now we have the exact same hair. It’s quite funny.

 Vogue Italia - October 2014

What an honor to be in Italian Vogue two months running! Last month you might remember was Vogue Italia’s 50th anniversary cover and editorial. This month I had the chance to shoot again with the amazing Steven Meisel alongside some of my favorite models for a story perfect for fall weather. Stay tuned for this editorial’s accompanying video! Xx Coco

SHAPE SHIFT

Photographer: Steven Meisel
Stylist: Karl Templer
Hair: Guido Palau
Make-up: Pat McGrath
Models: Coco Rocha, Karlie Kloss, Lexi Boling, Sasha Pivovarova, & Aymeline Valade

Lovely industry insight into the wonderful world of my friend Jean Paul Gaultier in The New York Times. His final Ready-To-Wear show is truly the end of an era! Xx

Jean Paul Gaultier’s Shows, the Clothes, the Man and His HeritageBy JOHN KOBLIN and MATTHEW SCHNEIER SEPT. 23, 2014The news that JPG was shutting down his ready-to-wear business, with his last collection scheduled to be shown on Saturday in Paris, prompted recollections from industry notables who have long considered Mr. Gaultier one of the most original people in fashion — both on and off the runway.The ShowsThierry-Maxime Loriot, curator, “The Fashion World of Jean Paul Gaultier: From the Sidewalk to the Catwalk”: “He pushed barriers of fashion and society and showed an open vision of society. Everybody was always welcome on his catwalk — whatever age, body shape, skin color, gender … there’s something very humanist in his approach to fashion. For me, that’s the most important thing.”Franca Sozzani, editor of Italian Vogue: “The ’80s and the ’90s were really his years. When we were going to Paris, Jean Paul Gaultier was the one you go to see.”Tim Blanks, editor at large, Style.com: “He was absolutely peerless for the longest time in the late ’80s and early ’90s. Each show was an absolutely remarkable hybrid of fashion and social comment. The sense of event that surrounded fashion was very different from the sense of event that surrounds it now. It was much more like a cult band inspiring this incredible devotion. The crowd would be full of drag queens and cult rock stars and things.”Marian McEvoy, European fashion editor at Women’s Wear Daily, 1975-90: “When he first began, like so many designers, he wasn’t rolling in the big bucks, so he would give out favors. His Christmas presents were really unusual. One of his first collections, he gave all the people in the audience very large, metallic bracelets that were actually tin cans. It was so funny. We were all wearing this tin can for about a week.”Ken Downing, fashion director of Neiman Marcus: “The theater and the drama always made those Gaultier shows. I liked the show where there were bales of hay everywhere. And the models came out with hay in their hair. And as they were traversing through all of it, the dust from the hay was kicking up and we were all getting a little weepy and not because the fashion was so moving but because our eyes were filling with dust from the straw. It was one of those moments.”Simon Doonan, creative ambassador, Barneys New York: “If you look at his old shows, they were often about 45 minutes long, which today is unthinkable. You have eight minutes of choreographed efficiency today. People would be terrified to have a show run for that length. I can still remember going to Gaultier shows, with incense and clanging bells and people laughing. It was a completely different atmosphere to the shows today, which are very militaristic.”Michelle Stein, president, Aeffe USA (Aeffe held the Jean Paul Gaultier license from 1994 to 2012): “I was always just breathless at the end of every show and hoping that everyone in the audience was as excited as I was, which was not always the case. When People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA) stormed the runway [at the fall 2003 show], the people at Gaultier were prepared! The security was out with these massive fur coats, and they jumped up on the runway and wrapped these people in the fur coats and off the runway! Oh my god, it was crazy.”The ClothesThierry-Maxime Loriot: “When you see Gaultier clothes, you don’t even need to look at the label. You just recognize it immediately.”Marian McEvoy: “There was a real rapport with the streets, right from the very beginning. I think that’s where he gleaned a lot of his ideas, straight from the street, not an idea or a travelogue.”Simon Doonan: “Years ago, Madonna loaned us at Barneys the pointy-bra, gold ‘Blonde Ambition’ corset. It was the most beautifully made thing I’ve ever seen in my life. It took us hours to unlace it and get it onto a mannequin. It was a piece of exquisite craftsmanship.”Linda Fargo, senior vice president, Bergdorf Goodman: “That cone bra? That’s something he started as a boy. There was a teddy bear that he had and he actually made, out of paper or something, on his teddy bear. What was he, 5 or 6? And he was already dreaming about a cone bra on a bear.”The ManMarian McEvoy: “He had a wonderful sense of playfulness, humor was a big part of his look and his style. But he was clearly a very solid fashion designer. It was highly unusual. I guess if you think that his contemporaries at that moment were people like Thierry Mugler and Claude Montana — let’s just say they took themselves much more seriously.”Coco Rocha, model: “He was one who treated models like human beings. I know that sounds ridiculous, but sometimes you go to castings and they don’t know your name, you’re just there to wear the clothes. Gaultier, you will go to his atelier and he has food and he wants to sit down with you. He even took me out to his rooftop to watch the sunset. He takes time with his models and let’s them know what the whole show is about. We feel more creative. You want to do good for him. You don’t want to just walk down the runway.”The ProvocateurHamish Bowles, Vogue’s international editor at large, who as the 25-year-old fashion director of Harpers & Queen, walked the runway in Mr. Gaultier’s fall 1989 show, after a chance encounter a few months earlier in Riccione, Italy, where the collection was being produced: “Jean Paul had a party bus for his team and one night we went from mega disco to mega disco, which was cheesy fun. Very late, that tipsy night, his general factotum and press guy Lionel Vermeil said to me, ‘Jean Paul has been thinking that he’d really like you to be in his next women’s show … would you consider it?’ Naturally, I was thrilled beyond and immediately said, ‘Yes, yes, yes,’ at which point Lionel added, ‘The show is inspired by ’20s Weimar lesbians.’“I hadn’t told a soul and there was only a very slow realization in the audience that it was me — largely I think because on my first exit I really camped it up doing exaggerated ‘Paris is Burning’ runway moves (which happily have been eviscerated from the only YouTube video I could find), whilst everyone else had got the dour Weimar brief and came stomping out looking surly. So there was no mistaking me. Before I went out a second time, Jean Paul instructed me to tone down the moves, which was just as well as the pants under my kilt had been taken out too much after the fitting and started sliding down my then snake-like hips in mid shimmy — so my statelier gait helped avoid an international incident as one hand on hip was effectively keeping the pants up. I don’t think anyone could believe that I’d actually done it but it was all part of JPG’s revolutionary gender-bender antics.”His LegacyMichelle Stein: “The whole industry has changed so much since Jean Paul began, but he’s just one of the best designers who have ever lived. It’s so sad to think that the general public will no longer have the opportunity to see the ready to wear, nor to wear it. I still go into my closet and my favorite pieces in my wardrobe are Jean Paul Gaultier.”Thierry-Maxime Loriot: “When you see who was assisting him, from Martin Margiela to Nicolas Ghesquière to Peter Dundas, who have all been Gaultier’s assistants, you really see in their work how they’ve been influenced by him. He left a big print in the fashion industry.”Linda Fargo: “For me, Jean Paul Gaultier was part of my awakening in fashion. There’s a handful of designers that did that for me.”Coco Rocha: Gaultier, along with Steven Meisel, made my career. Meisel was the one who found me, scouted me, made me. Gaultier? He made me Irish dance down the runway in 2007. Every day I’m reminded by someone who says, ‘You were the girl that Irish-danced down Gaultier’s runway.’ People remember that.”Simon Doonan: “Often fashion today feels a little bit abstract. You look at these very expensive, complicated collections that are shown by high-level designers and you think, ‘I wonder who’s going to wear that.’ With Gaultier, the models were wearing it, the editors were wearing it, and the general public was wearing it — or wearing some version of it that was mass-produced.”Tim Blanks: “I think there was a sense for a very long time that JPG would be the heir to Yves Saint Laurent, that he was the standard-bearer for French fashion at its purest. It was so obvious that Gaultier should be the designer at Dior. Galliano got the job and I remember people were quite surprised by that.”Stefano Tonchi, editor of W magazine: “I think he invented streetwear in prêt-à-porter. He brought it there. Now, really, it doesn’t quite exist anymore. Prêt-à-porter is couture. The prices, the look, the things that you see at prêt-à-porter collections are really couture. It’s like beautiful couture pieces made in multiples.”Anna Wintour, editor in chief of American Vogue and artistic director of Condé Nast: “He’s always been a showman. I do think that recently his whole emphasis has been much more on the couture and having fun with the couture. I don’t think we’re going to lose that Gaultier moment.”

Lovely industry insight into the wonderful world of my friend Jean Paul Gaultier in The New York Times. His final Ready-To-Wear show is truly the end of an era! Xx

Jean Paul Gaultier’s Shows, the Clothes, the Man and His Heritage
By JOHN KOBLIN and MATTHEW SCHNEIER SEPT. 23, 2014

The news that JPG was shutting down his ready-to-wear business, with his last collection scheduled to be shown on Saturday in Paris, prompted recollections from industry notables who have long considered Mr. Gaultier one of the most original people in fashion — both on and off the runway.

The Shows

Thierry-Maxime Loriot, curator, “The Fashion World of Jean Paul Gaultier: From the Sidewalk to the Catwalk”: “He pushed barriers of fashion and society and showed an open vision of society. Everybody was always welcome on his catwalk — whatever age, body shape, skin color, gender … there’s something very humanist in his approach to fashion. For me, that’s the most important thing.”

Franca Sozzani, editor of Italian Vogue: “The ’80s and the ’90s were really his years. When we were going to Paris, Jean Paul Gaultier was the one you go to see.”

Tim Blanks, editor at large, Style.com: “He was absolutely peerless for the longest time in the late ’80s and early ’90s. Each show was an absolutely remarkable hybrid of fashion and social comment. The sense of event that surrounded fashion was very different from the sense of event that surrounds it now. It was much more like a cult band inspiring this incredible devotion. The crowd would be full of drag queens and cult rock stars and things.”

Marian McEvoy, European fashion editor at Women’s Wear Daily, 1975-90: “When he first began, like so many designers, he wasn’t rolling in the big bucks, so he would give out favors. His Christmas presents were really unusual. One of his first collections, he gave all the people in the audience very large, metallic bracelets that were actually tin cans. It was so funny. We were all wearing this tin can for about a week.”

Ken Downing, fashion director of Neiman Marcus: “The theater and the drama always made those Gaultier shows. I liked the show where there were bales of hay everywhere. And the models came out with hay in their hair. And as they were traversing through all of it, the dust from the hay was kicking up and we were all getting a little weepy and not because the fashion was so moving but because our eyes were filling with dust from the straw. It was one of those moments.”

Simon Doonan, creative ambassador, Barneys New York: “If you look at his old shows, they were often about 45 minutes long, which today is unthinkable. You have eight minutes of choreographed efficiency today. People would be terrified to have a show run for that length. I can still remember going to Gaultier shows, with incense and clanging bells and people laughing. It was a completely different atmosphere to the shows today, which are very militaristic.”

Michelle Stein, president, Aeffe USA (Aeffe held the Jean Paul Gaultier license from 1994 to 2012): “I was always just breathless at the end of every show and hoping that everyone in the audience was as excited as I was, which was not always the case. When People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA) stormed the runway [at the fall 2003 show], the people at Gaultier were prepared! The security was out with these massive fur coats, and they jumped up on the runway and wrapped these people in the fur coats and off the runway! Oh my god, it was crazy.”

The Clothes

Thierry-Maxime Loriot: “When you see Gaultier clothes, you don’t even need to look at the label. You just recognize it immediately.”

Marian McEvoy: “There was a real rapport with the streets, right from the very beginning. I think that’s where he gleaned a lot of his ideas, straight from the street, not an idea or a travelogue.”

Simon Doonan: “Years ago, Madonna loaned us at Barneys the pointy-bra, gold ‘Blonde Ambition’ corset. It was the most beautifully made thing I’ve ever seen in my life. It took us hours to unlace it and get it onto a mannequin. It was a piece of exquisite craftsmanship.”

Linda Fargo, senior vice president, Bergdorf Goodman: “That cone bra? That’s something he started as a boy. There was a teddy bear that he had and he actually made, out of paper or something, on his teddy bear. What was he, 5 or 6? And he was already dreaming about a cone bra on a bear.”

The Man

Marian McEvoy: “He had a wonderful sense of playfulness, humor was a big part of his look and his style. But he was clearly a very solid fashion designer. It was highly unusual. I guess if you think that his contemporaries at that moment were people like Thierry Mugler and Claude Montana — let’s just say they took themselves much more seriously.”

Coco Rocha, model: “He was one who treated models like human beings. I know that sounds ridiculous, but sometimes you go to castings and they don’t know your name, you’re just there to wear the clothes. Gaultier, you will go to his atelier and he has food and he wants to sit down with you. He even took me out to his rooftop to watch the sunset. He takes time with his models and let’s them know what the whole show is about. We feel more creative. You want to do good for him. You don’t want to just walk down the runway.”

The Provocateur

Hamish Bowles, Vogue’s international editor at large, who as the 25-year-old fashion director of Harpers & Queen, walked the runway in Mr. Gaultier’s fall 1989 show, after a chance encounter a few months earlier in Riccione, Italy, where the collection was being produced: “Jean Paul had a party bus for his team and one night we went from mega disco to mega disco, which was cheesy fun. Very late, that tipsy night, his general factotum and press guy Lionel Vermeil said to me, ‘Jean Paul has been thinking that he’d really like you to be in his next women’s show … would you consider it?’ Naturally, I was thrilled beyond and immediately said, ‘Yes, yes, yes,’ at which point Lionel added, ‘The show is inspired by ’20s Weimar lesbians.’

“I hadn’t told a soul and there was only a very slow realization in the audience that it was me — largely I think because on my first exit I really camped it up doing exaggerated ‘Paris is Burning’ runway moves (which happily have been eviscerated from the only YouTube video I could find), whilst everyone else had got the dour Weimar brief and came stomping out looking surly. So there was no mistaking me. Before I went out a second time, Jean Paul instructed me to tone down the moves, which was just as well as the pants under my kilt had been taken out too much after the fitting and started sliding down my then snake-like hips in mid shimmy — so my statelier gait helped avoid an international incident as one hand on hip was effectively keeping the pants up. I don’t think anyone could believe that I’d actually done it but it was all part of JPG’s revolutionary gender-bender antics.”

His Legacy

Michelle Stein: “The whole industry has changed so much since Jean Paul began, but he’s just one of the best designers who have ever lived. It’s so sad to think that the general public will no longer have the opportunity to see the ready to wear, nor to wear it. I still go into my closet and my favorite pieces in my wardrobe are Jean Paul Gaultier.”

Thierry-Maxime Loriot: “When you see who was assisting him, from Martin Margiela to Nicolas Ghesquière to Peter Dundas, who have all been Gaultier’s assistants, you really see in their work how they’ve been influenced by him. He left a big print in the fashion industry.”

Linda Fargo: “For me, Jean Paul Gaultier was part of my awakening in fashion. There’s a handful of designers that did that for me.”

Coco Rocha: Gaultier, along with Steven Meisel, made my career. Meisel was the one who found me, scouted me, made me. Gaultier? He made me Irish dance down the runway in 2007. Every day I’m reminded by someone who says, ‘You were the girl that Irish-danced down Gaultier’s runway.’ People remember that.”

Simon Doonan: “Often fashion today feels a little bit abstract. You look at these very expensive, complicated collections that are shown by high-level designers and you think, ‘I wonder who’s going to wear that.’ With Gaultier, the models were wearing it, the editors were wearing it, and the general public was wearing it — or wearing some version of it that was mass-produced.”

Tim Blanks: “I think there was a sense for a very long time that JPG would be the heir to Yves Saint Laurent, that he was the standard-bearer for French fashion at its purest. It was so obvious that Gaultier should be the designer at Dior. Galliano got the job and I remember people were quite surprised by that.”

Stefano Tonchi, editor of W magazine: “I think he invented streetwear in prêt-à-porter. He brought it there. Now, really, it doesn’t quite exist anymore. Prêt-à-porter is couture. The prices, the look, the things that you see at prêt-à-porter collections are really couture. It’s like beautiful couture pieces made in multiples.”

Anna Wintour, editor in chief of American Vogue and artistic director of Condé Nast: “He’s always been a showman. I do think that recently his whole emphasis has been much more on the couture and having fun with the couture. I don’t think we’re going to lose that Gaultier moment.”

wilhelmina:

Coco Rocha’s Dance off
With a little coaching by Jacob Burton, Supermodel Coco Rocha brought lighthearted vibes to the Wilhelmina Models NYFW Party with a dance move only she could bring back: ‘the running man.’
#AreYouFollowingMe?Instagram: @WilhelminaModelsTwitter: @wilhelmina
Coco Rocha:Instagram: @CocorochaTwitter: @cocorochaTumblr: #Oh-So-Coco
Jacob Burton:Instagram: @Jacob_Burton1

wilhelmina:

Coco Rocha’s Dance off

With a little coaching by Jacob Burton, Supermodel Coco Rocha brought lighthearted vibes to the Wilhelmina Models NYFW Party with a dance move only she could bring back: ‘the running man.’

#AreYouFollowingMe?
Instagram: @WilhelminaModels
Twitter: @wilhelmina

Coco Rocha:
Instagram: @Cocorocha
Twitter: @cocorocha
Tumblr: #Oh-So-Coco

Jacob Burton:
Instagram: @Jacob_Burton1