Moving Images and Images That Move Us
By Coco Rocha for PCMag

The rise of the internet has spouted a deluge of images. Has it rendered the visual nearly meaningless? If so, how can skilled creators use tech to turn that around?

There was a time when seeing a picture was a rare privilege. In the days before photography and the modern printing process you’d be lucky to have your own artwork at home and, if you did, family, neighbors, and guests would probably gather around it for hours on end. Though the printing press made images available on a mass level in the 15th century, they were still not cheap or easy to come by for most. By the late 18th century magazines started to find their place in households around the world and by the middle of the 20th century advertisers using images as a means for communication had reached their golden age. There was no casually thumbing through the few magazines you had access to each month. Each picture would be dutifully inspected and a great image would be remembered for life.

For a hundred years that was the way of the world until the information age when the Internet spouted at first a steady trickle and then a deluge of images. Today the average person surfing the Internet and sites like Tumblr or Instagram may see hundreds if not thousands of new pictures and images a day. Whether they’re good, bad, or ugly, images go in and out of our consciousness without leaving much - if any - impression.

This change in attitude toward the image is devastating to publishers and advertisers who face an exponential increase in competition and a decrease in attention. As a model I feel it as much as anyone in the business; my role in fashion and advertising is to draw the viewer in, make him or her stop and consider: are we holding your attention? For my peers and I the answer is probably “Yes, but not for long enough,” and for that reason I think static images as advertising have to change.

The futures of both advertising and fashion editorials have to lie with far more interactive images…

READ MORE AT PCMAG (click)

(Photos by Eric Cheng for Lytro - Art direction by James Conran. Styling by Rebecca Conran)

Moving Images and Images That Move UsBy Coco Rocha for PCMag
The rise of the internet has spouted a deluge of images. Has it rendered the visual nearly meaningless? If so, how can skilled creators use tech to turn that around?
There was a time when seeing a picture was a rare privilege. In the days before photography and the modern printing process you’d be lucky to have your own artwork at home and, if you did, family, neighbors, and guests would probably gather around it for hours on end. Though the printing press made images available on a mass level in the 15th century, they were still not cheap or easy to come by for most. By the late 18th century magazines started to find their place in households around the world and by the middle of the 20th century advertisers using images as a means for communication had reached their golden age. There was no casually thumbing through the few magazines you had access to each month. Each picture would be dutifully inspected and a great image would be remembered for life.
For a hundred years that was the way of the world until the information age when the Internet spouted at first a steady trickle and then a deluge of images. Today the average person surfing the Internet and sites like Tumblr or Instagram may see hundreds if not thousands of new pictures and images a day. Whether they’re good, bad, or ugly, images go in and out of our consciousness without leaving much - if any - impression.This change in attitude toward the image is devastating to publishers and advertisers who face an exponential increase in competition and a decrease in attention. As a model I feel it as much as anyone in the business; my role in fashion and advertising is to draw the viewer in, make him or her stop and consider: are we holding your attention? For my peers and I the answer is probably “Yes, but not for long enough,” and for that reason I think static images as advertising have to change.
The futures of both advertising and fashion editorials have to lie with far more interactive images…
READ MORE AT PCMAG (click)
(photo by Jamie Beck for Senhoa)

Moving Images and Images That Move Us
By Coco Rocha for PCMag

The rise of the internet has spouted a deluge of images. Has it rendered the visual nearly meaningless? If so, how can skilled creators use tech to turn that around?

There was a time when seeing a picture was a rare privilege. In the days before photography and the modern printing process you’d be lucky to have your own artwork at home and, if you did, family, neighbors, and guests would probably gather around it for hours on end. Though the printing press made images available on a mass level in the 15th century, they were still not cheap or easy to come by for most. By the late 18th century magazines started to find their place in households around the world and by the middle of the 20th century advertisers using images as a means for communication had reached their golden age. There was no casually thumbing through the few magazines you had access to each month. Each picture would be dutifully inspected and a great image would be remembered for life.

For a hundred years that was the way of the world until the information age when the Internet spouted at first a steady trickle and then a deluge of images. Today the average person surfing the Internet and sites like Tumblr or Instagram may see hundreds if not thousands of new pictures and images a day. Whether they’re good, bad, or ugly, images go in and out of our consciousness without leaving much - if any - impression.

This change in attitude toward the image is devastating to publishers and advertisers who face an exponential increase in competition and a decrease in attention. As a model I feel it as much as anyone in the business; my role in fashion and advertising is to draw the viewer in, make him or her stop and consider: are we holding your attention? For my peers and I the answer is probably “Yes, but not for long enough,” and for that reason I think static images as advertising have to change.

The futures of both advertising and fashion editorials have to lie with far more interactive images…

READ MORE AT PCMAG (click)

(photo by Jamie Beck for Senhoa)

Coco Rocha for Senhoa
Images by Jamie Beck and Kevin Burg
.

As a model I’m asked to sell all kinds of products. Sometimes it’s shoes, gowns, lipsticks… sometimes it’s even Coca Cola. The launch of the Coco Rocha for Senhoa jewelry line marks the first time I’ve ever tried to sell a product that was entirely of my own creation. But more than that, this is a very special venture for me. I first found out about Senhoa at my wedding in France last summer. Lisa, the founder, gifted me a beautiful Senhoa bracelet which I wore the first day of my wedding. She told me the story behind the jewelry and Senhoa. Between the ages of 4 and 19, these girls are rescued from brothels and human trafficking in Cambodia. Many of the girls do not have a family to return to as it was their families who actually sold them into slavery in the first place. The girls receive a full education and rehabilitation in the Senhoa program and are offered a job in jewelry-making when they turn 15. This job pays them even more than school teachers make. In just 2 years Senhoa now has over 50 girls in the program.

After meeting Lisa I tried to wear Senhoa pieces at events and on the red carpet, mentioning them whenever I could. Earlier this year we decided that a jewelry collaboration was probably the best way I could lend my voice to the cause and so I poured myself into the process of sketching and designing the jewelry. I knew I wanted to create bold statement pieces that were both powerful and beautiful as I felt that this would aptly symbolize the Senhoa girl who is being empowered by the Senhoa program.  I flew out to L.A. to actually put the jewelry together myself and I’m glad I did -  I got to experience firsthand the intricate and painstaking work the girls put into this jewelry (I spent a whole day beading just one piece!). We used high quality materials like Swarovski crystals in the jewelry, which not only add to the beauty of the product, but also help instill the feeling of self-worth in these girls who are now working with and associating themselves with materials of high value. I think one of the great things about this jewelry line is that every hand that worked on it,  from design to production, is deeply invested in its success. Hopefully you’ll feel the love when you wear the pieces.

Our slogan with the Coco Rocha for Senhoa line is “accessorize your conscience” because, unlike many of the purchases you might make for yourself, you don’t need to feel guilty about this one. Once the older girls are paid for their time as jewelry makers, all the profit goes to fund the food, medicine, shelter and education of the younger ones. It’s a cycle of girls helping girls and I’m so proud to be a part of it all.

This Friday I can think of few purchases as worthwhile as a piece from this jewelry line, for you or your loved one. Please go to www.senhoa.com/cocorocha to find out more.

xx Coco Rocha

It has now been a few weeks since I posted the first of these wonderful collaborations between Jamie Beck and myself, but sadly this is the last.To see more of the images, please go HERE.P.S. This picture was taken in our guest bedroom which is full of our antique curios. If you look over my left shoulder you’ll see an old picture of my husband, James, as a baby with his parents - on my right is James’ granddad’s policeman helmet.

It has now been a few weeks since I posted the first of these wonderful collaborations between Jamie Beck and myself, but sadly this is the last.

To see more of the images, please go HERE.

P.S. This picture was taken in our guest bedroom which is full of our antique curios. If you look over my left shoulder you’ll see an old picture of my husband, James, as a baby with his parents - on my right is James’ granddad’s policeman helmet.

Yep, the Jamie and Coco collaborations just keep coming! I’m so glad to see the images I’ve posted so far on my blog have received an overwhelming amount of support. Not only were they featured in The Atlantic, Refinery29 and Modelinia but they were re-blogged over 35,000 times on various tumblr blogs. Amazing.
We have a few more images to post from our shoot so stay tuned…


Yep, the Jamie and Coco collaborations just keep coming! I’m so glad to see the images I’ve posted so far on my blog have received an overwhelming amount of support. Not only were they featured in The Atlantic, Refinery29 and Modelinia but they were re-blogged over 35,000 times on various tumblr blogs. Amazing.

We have a few more images to post from our shoot so stay tuned…

NEW YORK, NY.Through my new friends at tumblr headquarters I’ve recently come in contact with a very talented young photographer named Jamie. She and her fiance create these beautiful images that are more than a photo, but not quite a video. NOTE *Of course the technology to create GIFs has been around for decades but I believe its potential for both expression and impact within the fashion world has yet to be fully explored. Let me put it this way - film has been around for a century, does that mean that we’ve exhausted the possibilities? I for one am super excited to see how Jamie and others use multimedia within fashion in years to come.

NEW YORK, NY.

Through my new friends at tumblr headquarters I’ve recently come in contact with a very talented young photographer named Jamie. She and her fiance create these beautiful images that are more than a photo, but not quite a video.

NOTE *Of course the technology to create GIFs has been around for decades but I believe its potential for both expression and impact within the fashion world has yet to be fully explored. Let me put it this way - film has been around for a century, does that mean that we’ve exhausted the possibilities? I for one am super excited to see how Jamie and others use multimedia within fashion in years to come.