T MAGAZINE - Steven Sebring’s Fourth-Dimensional Perspective
“It’s dope, isn’t it?” asked Steven Sebring in his Lower Manhattan studio. He was gazing at what he calls the Rig, a 10.5-by-15-foot igloo-like silver contraption (or “geodome”) designed to capture the form and movement of the subject standing inside from every imaginable angle. Sebring, a fashion photographer and award-winning filmmaker, used the device to create “Revolution,” a three-year effort on display for three days at the 69th Regiment Armory. The multimedia exhibition pays simultaneous tribute to the 19th-century English photographer Eadweard Muybridge and to Marcel Duchamp, whose abstract classic “Nude Descending a Staircase, No. 2″ drew inspiration from Muybridge’s pioneering stop-motion imagery. The device contains 100 synchronized cameras that shoot in predetermined sequences, allowing Sebring to capture form and movement from numerous perspectives simultaneously — for example, his muse, Coco Rocha, spinning and dancing (as seen in “Discovery,” the first clip above). He can then present the results in numerous forms, including film, photographs and sculpture.
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“Revolution,” which Sebring financed through his fashion photography for such companies as M.A.C. and Coach, is a technical quantum leap from his previous film project, the excellent but conventional Patti Smith documentary “Dream of Life.” The genesis for the project came to him while he was studying “a way to photograph humans as art,” explained the usually secretive artist, dressed in his signature brown fedora and heavy black horn-rims. “This is a true collision of Muybridge and Duchamp. It’s a vision — or video — of the minds of those artists.” He describes it as a peek into the fourth dimension because of the way it allows viewers to experience a singular moment in time from multiple viewpoints. “If people say this isn’t the fourth dimension — then show me it. Because nobody’s ever seen it before.”
Visitors to the armory will encounter 25 works of photography, sculpture and film that use Sebring’s technology. The exhibition comes 100 years after Duchamp scandalized American audiences at the legendary 1913 Armory Show with the stateside debut of “Nude Descending a Staircase, No. 2,” and Sebring wouldn’t object if his work elicits a similar reaction. “The possibilities are monstrous,” he exclaimed. “This could change the future of fashion photography. Why would anyone want to see flat portraits anymore?” Whatever happens when expected guests like Patti Smith, Donna Karan, Delphine and Reed Krakoff, Johan Lindberg, and Coco Rocha descend upon the official opening of “Revolution” on Wednesday evening, Sebring will be enjoying himself. “I’m just going to step back and watch,” he said with a puckish grin. “I’ll be a complete voyeur.”
“Revolution” is on view from May 21 to May 23 at the 69th Regiment Armory, 68 Lexington Avenue, New York; sebringrevolution.com.

T MAGAZINE - Steven Sebring’s Fourth-Dimensional Perspective

“It’s dope, isn’t it?” asked Steven Sebring in his Lower Manhattan studio. He was gazing at what he calls the Rig, a 10.5-by-15-foot igloo-like silver contraption (or “geodome”) designed to capture the form and movement of the subject standing inside from every imaginable angle. Sebring, a fashion photographer and award-winning filmmaker, used the device to create “Revolution,” a three-year effort on display for three days at the 69th Regiment Armory. The multimedia exhibition pays simultaneous tribute to the 19th-century English photographer Eadweard Muybridge and to Marcel Duchamp, whose abstract classic “Nude Descending a Staircase, No. 2″ drew inspiration from Muybridge’s pioneering stop-motion imagery. The device contains 100 synchronized cameras that shoot in predetermined sequences, allowing Sebring to capture form and movement from numerous perspectives simultaneously — for example, his muse, Coco Rocha, spinning and dancing (as seen in “Discovery,” the first clip above). He can then present the results in numerous forms, including film, photographs and sculpture.

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COCO ROCHA: POWDER PLAY
By Jessica Conatser

In this round of Milk Made Photo Stories, we celebrate Photographer James Houston’s completion of his latest photo series, Natural Beauty – debuting at Milk Gallery April 23rd.

From nailing the first shot all the way to accidentally walking off set with green hair, top model, Coco Rocha and Houston share their personal experiences with us on what it was like to capture the “Powder Play” image for his project in support of Global Green USA.

Coco’s Story: “Working alongside James Houston and Zanna Roberts Rassi is always a pleasure and I’m very proud of this whole project. The pigment used in my shoot literally turned my hair green for a day following, but since it was for a “green project” it was all worth it. It’s a privilege to be part of this “Global Green” project and it pushes me to think about what else I can do. I hope that those who have the chance to see it will leave inspired and want to do what they can to make the world a greener place too.” – Coco Rocha

James’ Story: “Working on a project this large is like shooting a massive magazine issue. I am constantly thinking about new ideas and the overall vision. I was looking at a lot of nature shots for reference and inspiration and happened to come across an exploding pollen tree.. Sounds crazy! I’d never seen one before but loved the image and idea.

When I finally got to shoot with Coco Rocha I wanted to use this concept as I knew she was an incredible mover and bright Indian Festival powders on her body would help illustrate the movement and energy she brings to set. We started with one color and the first jump she did ended up in the book. That is the jumping image you see here. As she continued to jump and move we added more and more colors. By the end she was literally covered head to toe in powder like she had been in an actual Indian festival.” – James Houston

Interview Russia - September 2012

For Interview Russia's September issue I got to play a deranged ballerina. We were aiming for more than just another fashion editorial on this and I really think we delved deep into the art of fashion photography. While I absolutely adore my cheeky 1950s shoot with Ellen Von Unwerth, this may be my own favorite editorial of the season!

xoxo 
Coco 

Photographer: Andreas Sjodin
Stylist: Karen Kaiser
Hair: Rudi Lewis
Makeup: Maud Laceppe

ARTISTS - Through my outlets on social media, I’m occasionally sent pieces of art created by people all around the world who were inspired by some picture or image I was in. I’ve been collecting this artwork for a while now and thought it was time to share some with you. To see a gallery of the amazing artwork I have been sent over the years, please go HERE.

ARTISTS - Through my outlets on social media, I’m occasionally sent pieces of art created by people all around the world who were inspired by some picture or image I was in. I’ve been collecting this artwork for a while now and thought it was time to share some with you.

To see a gallery of the amazing artwork I have been sent over the years, please go HERE.

James At Naag

So amongst other ventures (he always juggles at least a half dozen at a time) my Mr. Conran is currently in the middle of 4 weeks as guest art director for Agyness Deyn and Fiona Byrne’s online magazine NAAG. I picked a few of my favorite cutout collages he’s done over the last week or so to post here. If they seem a bit left field, you’ll just have to read the articles ;)